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Blog Profile / Civil War Memory


URL :http://cwmemory.com/
Filed Under:History / US History
Posts on Regator:2686
Posts / Week:7.6
Archived Since:March 3, 2008

Blog Post Archive

“We Shall Overcome”

Looks like more Confederate Battle flags are flying over America’s Southern highways, but I suspect that heritage groups won’t be celebrating. A group calling itself “The Lewla Movement” hopes to spark discussion about race relations, history and the meaning of the Confederate flag. I appreciate how this billboard juxtaposes the history of the flag and... Continue reading

The Exceptionalism of American Slavery

As I continue to make my way through Edward Baptist’s book, The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism, I can’t help but think about its implications for the way we think about the idea of American Exceptionalism. It’s a timely issue given the recent debates about the revised AP... Continue reading

White Southerners To Dedicate Monument to Confederate Massacre

There are a number of narratives that have emerged over the course of the sesquicentennial. While the story of black Union soldiers has taken center stage, focus on the War in the West and guerrilla warfare isn’t far behind. Scholarship on the Western theater is on the rise, but popular interest can also be seen... Continue reading

Walking in Lincoln’s Footsteps

I had an incredible time in Springfield, Illinois this past weekend. Thanks to Sam Wheeler, who is the Research Historian for the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library, for inviting me to speak at Friday’s Luncheon. He was an incredibly gracious host. My talk on Louis Martin and the Crater went over very well. The audience asked... Continue reading

New To the Civil War Memory Library, 09/24

Barbara Berenson, Boston and the Civil War: Hub of the Second Revolution (History Press, 2014). Graham Dozier ed., A Gunner in Lee’s Army: The Civil War Letters of Thomas Henry Carter (University of North Carolina Press, 2014). Harold Holzer, Lincoln and the Power of the Press: The War for Public Opinion (Simon and Schuster, 2014).... Continue reading

Is This Text Appropriate for the Classroom?

I consider myself lucky to work in a History Department that reflects seriously on pedagogy and has command of their respective subject areas. Today I decided to share the opening of chapter 7 in Edward Baptists new book, which as you know I’ve been reading and commenting on over the past few weeks. We talked... Continue reading

“I’m Proud To Be a Confederate, Where We Still Have Slavery”

I don’t watch the animated series, “Squidbillies”, but I can’t resist it when the topic is the Civil War and memory. This is not the first time that the show has taken on the subject. In this brief clip the gang pokes fun at the light show displayed on the face of Stone Mountain in... Continue reading

“Gone With the Wind” in France

Today a #GoneWithTheWind themed ball at the Château de Breteuil with French southern belles and Confederate officers. pic.twitter.com/xhXdn4nHNh — NicolasMartinBreteau (@NMartinBreteau) September 21, 2014

Remembering Pvt. Louis Martin in the Land of Lincoln

On Thursday I am heading to Springfield, Illinois for the Conference on Illinois History. I was invited to give a luncheon talk on Private Louis Martin, who was severely wounded at the Crater, and who is buried in an unmarked grave in Oak Ridge Cemetery near Lincoln’s final resting place. A gravestone was recently dedicated... Continue reading

“Fuck This Mud”

Chapter 7 of Edward Baptist’s The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism begins with an incredibly violent and unusual description of a new season’s planting. Here are a few excerpts from that opening section. The next day it rains hard in the morning, but when it stops the men... Continue reading

Is There Room in Dark History…

I was perusing the program for the upcoming AHA in New York City and noticed a couple of interesting Civil War panels. They tend to reflect the recent turn toward exploring the emotional lives of soldiers and the challenges they faced throughout the postwar period – what some people are calling “dark history.” Here is... Continue reading

Why I Am Still Willing To Talk About It

I haven’t thought much about the subject of black Confederates in any serious way lately, but the brief interaction I had last night with a Twitter follower serves as a reminder of why I think it’s still important. Here is a link to the photographs referenced by @RRT2451.

Essay on John Bowie Magruder Uploaded

I wrote the first draft of this essay on the colonel of the 57th Virginia Infantry during a summer seminar that I took with Gary Gallagher in 2001. It was my first attempt at writing something substantial after moving to Charlottesville in 2000. Up until then I had written a bunch of book reviews and... Continue reading

Free Course With Eric Foner Starts Tomorrow

I hope some of you have the time to take advantage of another opportunity to study the Civil War Era with one of the most prominent scholars in the field. The course is free and begins tomorrow. The video is well worth watching, especially the second half in which Foner reflects on the influence of... Continue reading

A Taste of Civil War Memory Studies

Fellow blogger and historian, Keith Harris, recently asked me to put together a list of books for someone who might be interested in exploring the field of Civil War memory studies for his new online journal, The Americanist Independent.  The project is Keith’s attempt to utilize digital tools to bring quality history essays and other... Continue reading

Why Paternalism is Meaningless on the Plantation

It’s disheartening to hear people who continue to insist on distinctions between good and bad slaveowners. I’ve never understood such arguments. It’s the commodification of the individual itself along with the possibility and reality of sale of so many that renders the institution by definition as evil.  What takes place between master and slave on... Continue reading

The Problem With Baptists “The Half Has Never Been Told”

I think I am beginning to get a grip on what some people find troubling about Edward Baptist’s new book, The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism. Before saying anything I should point out that my understanding of the historiography of slavery is limited. I’ve read a number of... Continue reading

Just Imagine What the Virginia Flaggers Could Accomplish…

… if they could get more than 10 people to show up to one of their protests.

The Lovett School in Atlanta Remembers the Civil War

Even if you just have just a few minutes check out this wonderful dramatic reading focused on the Civil War in Georgia performed by students a The Lovett School in Atlanta. This is one of the best student productions that I’ve seen in quite some time and serves as a useful model to connect an... Continue reading

A Lee Who Supports W&L’s Decision to Remove Confederate Flags

In his convocation address yesterday at Washington & Lee University, President Ken Ruscio reflected on his decision to remove Confederate flags from inside Lee Chapel. At one point Ruscio shared a letter he received from an Alumnus of the Class of 1949. I have been following the issues…. I write to offer my unqualified endorsement... Continue reading

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