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Blog Profile / Web of Data


URL :http://webofdata.wordpress.com
Filed Under:Programming / Web Development
Posts on Regator:18
Posts / Week:0.1
Archived Since:August 23, 2011

Blog Post Archive

Cloud Cipher Capabilities

Where I'm reviewing support for encryption in the context of IaaS|PaaS|SaaS cloud service offerings as well as concerning Hadoop. While the motivation for encryption might differ, the primary question is if systems support this (transparently) or if developers are forced to code this in the application logic. Continue reading »

Elephant filet

In situations where Hadoop is used in a shared setup we witness two competing forces: the user expects performance vs. the view of the cluster owner who aims to optimise throughput and maximise utilisation. In the post, Michael elaborates a bit on challenges and solutions on this topic. Continue reading »

MapR, Europe and me

You might have already heard that MapR, the leading provider of enterprise-grade Hadoop and friends, is launching its European operations. Guess what? I’m joining MapR Europe as of January 2013 in the role of Chief Data Engineer EMEA and will support our technical and sales teams throughout Europe. Pretty exciting times ahead! As an aside: … Continue reading »

Hosted MapReduce and Hadoop offerings

Today’s question is: where are we regarding MapReduce/Hadoop in the cloud? That is, what are the offerings of Hadoop-as-a-Service or other hosted MapReduce implementations, currently? A year ago, InfoQ ran a story Hadoop-as-a-Service from Amazon, Cloudera, Microsoft and IBM which will serve us as a baseline here. Show More Summary

MapReduce for and with the kids

Last week was Halloween and of course we went trick-or-treating with our three kids which resulted in piles of sweets in the living room. Powered by the sugar, the kids would stay up late to count their harvest and while I was observing them at it, I was wondering if it possible to explain the … Continue reading »

Denormalizing graph-shaped data

As nicely pointed out by Ilya Katsov: Denormalization can be defined as the copying of the same data into multiple documents or tables in order to simplify/optimize query processing or to fit the user’s data into a particular data model. So, I was wondering, why is – in Ilya’s write-up – denormalization not considered to be … Continue reading »

Interactive analysis of large-scale datasets

The value of large-scale datasets – stemming from IoT sensors, end-user and business transactions, social networks, search engine logs, etc. – apparently lies in the patterns buried deep inside them. Being able to identify these patterns, analyzing them is vital. Be it for detecting fraud, determining a new customer segment or predicting a trend. As … Continue reading »

Schema.org + WebIntents = Awesomeness

Imagine you search for a camera, say a Canon EOS 60D, and in addition to the usual search results you’re as well offered a choice of actions you can perform on it, for example share the result with a friend, write a review for the item or, why not directly buy it? Sounds far fetched? … Continue reading »

Turning tabular data into entities

Two widely used data formats on the Web are CSV and JSON. In order to enable fine-grained access in an hypermedia-oriented fashion I’ve started to work on Tride, a mapping language that takes one or more CSV files as inputs and produces a set of (connected) JSON documents. In the 2 min demo video I … Continue reading »

Linked Data – the best of two worlds

On the one hand you have structured data sources such as relational DB, NoSQL datastores or OODBs and the like that allow you to query and manipulate data in a structured way. This typically involves schemata (either upfront with RDB or sort of dynamically with NoSQL that defines the data layout and the types of … Continue reading »

Why I luv JSON …

… because it’s simple, agnostic and an end-to-end solution. Wat? OK, let’s slow down a bit and go through the above keywords step by step. Simple Over 150 frameworks, libraries and tools directly support JSON in over 30 (!) languages. This might well be because the entire specification (incl. ToC, all the legal stuff and … Continue reading »

Hosted NoSQL

I admit I dunno how I got here in the first place … ah, right, yesterday was Paddy’s day and I was sitting at home with a sick child. Now, I tinkered around a bit with a hosted CouchDB solution to store/query JSON output from a side-project of mine. Then I thought: where are we … Continue reading »

Large-Scale Linked Data Processing: Cloud Computing to the Rescue?

At the upcoming 2nd International Conference on Cloud Computing and Services Science (CLOSER 2012) we – Robert Grossman, Andreas Harth, Philippe Cudré-Mauroux and myself – will present a paper with the title Large-Scale Linked Data Processing:...Show More Summary

Synchronising dataspaces at scale

So, I have a question for you – how would you approach the following (engineering) problem? Imagine you have two dataspaces, a source dataspace, such as Eurostat with some 5000+ datasets that can take up to several GB in the worst case, and a target dataspace (for example, something like what we’re deploying in the … Continue reading »

JSON, HTTP and data links

In late 2011, Mark Nottingham, whom I very much admire on a personal and professional level, posted ‘Linking in JSON‘ which triggered quite some discussion (see the comments there). Back then already I sensed that the community at large is ready for the next aspect of the Web. A scalable, machine-targeted way to realise a … Continue reading »

Open Data – a virtual natural resource

A virtual natural resource? Doesn’t make sense, does it? Let me explain. Natural resources are derived from the environment. Many of them are essential for our survival while others are used for satisfying our wants. … is with Wikipedia says about natural resources. Now, some 150 years ago a handful of people saw the potential … Continue reading »

… you end up with a graph

Quite often I hear people coming up with rather strange explanations why we use graphs, or to be more specific for the Web case, RDF. Some think that the reason is to make the developer’s life harder. Right. It’s so much easier to understand a key-value structure. And there are the ones who claim that … Continue reading »

Libraries – an important and vibrant Linked Data application domain

In late 2009 I was contacted by Tom Baker, Emmanuelle Bermes and Antoine Isaac to help fund the Library Linked Data Incubator Group (XG) at W3C and although I personally didn’t actively contribute (more a hurler-on-the-ditch like commenting, really) I am really, really happy with the outcome. To be fair, DERI was very active after … Continue reading »

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