Blog Profile / Physorg: Earth


URL :http://phys.org/earth-news/
Filed Under:Issues & Causes / Environmentalism
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Archived Since:September 5, 2016

Blog Post Archive

The high plains aquifer: Can we make it last?

The heart of the United States is a highly productive agricultural region. This "breadbasket" underpins much of U.S. society, but it also relies almost entirely on a complex network of diminishing groundwater resources.

How X-rays helped to solve mystery of floating rocks

It's true—some rocks can float on water for years at a time. And now scientists know how they do it, and what causes them to eventually sink.

Two missing World War II B-25 bombers documented by Project Recover off Papua New Guinea

Two B-25 bombers associated with American servicemen missing in action from World War II were recently documented in the waters off Papua New Guinea by Project Recover—a collaborative team of marine scientists, archaeologists and volunteers who have combined efforts to locate aircraft and associated MIAs from World War II.

Sea level rise prior to 1990 found to be slower than other estimates suggesting modern rise significantly faster

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from across Europe has found evidence that suggests the rate of rise in sea levels from approximately 1902 until 1990 was less than other models have shown. This indicates, the team reports in their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, that modern sea levels are rising faster than suspected.

Is there a green awakening in China?

Heavy air pollution has led to increased environmental consciousness in China. A growing number of apps now allow people to check local air quality. Apps also serve as tools for political activism.

The rainforest contains clues that can help scientists diagnose Earth's changing vital signs

Late one afternoon last October, Scott Saleska encountered a weirder-than-usual welcome to the remote Brazilian research station to which he had been coming for 17 years to study how the Amazon rainforest breathes.

Flickr study gives snapshot of coral reefs' value

Computer-led analysis of tourist snaps has estimated that coral reefs contribute $36 billion per year to the global tourist economy.

New model helps predict regional and seasonal sea ice extent

Scientists have developed a new method to forecast the extent of sea ice in some regions of the Arctic up to 11 months in advance. The method, which incorporates information about ocean temperatures and focuses on regions rather than the entire Arctic Sea, could help in the planning of activities ranging from shipping to oil and gas extraction, fishing and tourism.

Coring Arctic lakes to study Vikings

Billy D'Andrea, a Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory paleoclimatologist and Center for Climate and Life Fellow is currently doing fieldwork in Norway's Lofoten Islands. He's interested in the natural factors that may have influenced the growth of northern agriculture and rise of violent Viking chieftains during the Iron Age, ca. 500 BC to 1100 AD.

High-tech rainforest map brings climate and conservation efforts into sharp relief

Outside of the Amazon, the rainforests of central Africa are the largest in the world. They contain huge amounts of carbon and wildlife—two items at the top of the list for those looking to protect the planet's health.

Study emphasises the human dimension of a warmer climate

New research shows how reducing carbon emissions can prevent billions of people from being exposed to unheard-of changes in climate in the coming decades.

Air circulation affects frost more than global warming—for now

Gardeners know the frustration of a false spring. Coaxed outside by warm weather, some people plant their gardens in the spring only to see a sudden late frost strike at the plants with a killer freezer burn. Grumbling green thumbs, along with farmers and water supply managers, would benefit from more accurate predictions of the first and last frosts of the season.

China urges balance on environment, economy in Antarctica

A Chinese leader on Tuesday urged international representatives to strike a "proper balance" between environmental and economic interests in Antarctica, as the frozen continent's vulnerability to climate change raises worries that some nations could seek to exploit its natural resources.

Supercomputing helps researchers understand Earth's interior

Contrary to posters you may have seen hanging on the walls in science buildings and classrooms, Lijun Liu, professor of geology at Illinois, knows that Earth's interior is not like an onion.

Climate change taking toll on clarity of Lake Tahoe water

Climate change is causing Lake Tahoe to warm sooner in the spring than it has historically, disrupting the normal mixing of shallow and deep water and undercutting gains made in reversing the loss of clarity of the cobalt mountain lake, scientists say.

Research suggests eating beans instead of beef would sharply reduce greenhouse gasses

A team of researchers from four American universities says the key to reducing harmful greenhouse gases (GHG) in the short term is more likely to be found on the dinner plate than at the gas pump.

Research in Russia challenges widely held understanding of past climate history

Things are heating up in Russia. UNLV Geoscience Ph.D. student Jonathan Baker has found evidence that shows nearly continuous warming from the end of the last Ice Age to the present in the Ural Mountains in central Russia.

Weathering of rocks a poor regulator of global temperatures

A new University of Washington study shows that the textbook understanding of global chemical weathering—in which rocks are dissolved, washed down rivers and eventually end up on the ocean floor to begin the process again—does not depend on Earth's temperature in the way that geologists had believed.

Human-induced deforestation is causing an increase in malaria cases

Nearly 130 million hectares of forest—an area almost equivalent in size to South Africa—have been lost since 1990, according to a recent report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Smoke from wildfires can have lasting climate impact

The wildfire that has raged across more than 150,000 acres of the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia and Florida has sent smoke billowing into the sky as far as the eye can see. Now, new research published by the Georgia Institute of Technology shows how that smoke could impact the atmosphere and climate much more than previously thought.

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