Blog Profile / Physorg: Earth


URL :http://phys.org/earth-news/
Filed Under:Issues & Causes / Environmentalism
Posts on Regator:2375
Posts / Week:72
Archived Since:September 5, 2016

Blog Post Archive

Traditional Japanese uchimizu technique works to cool down hot cities

The simple old Japanese tradition of water sprinkling - uchimizu - is an effective way of reducing extreme heat in cities. This will be TU Delft researcher Anna Solcerova's message at the EGU General Assembly (European Geosciences Union) in Vienna on Monday 24 April.

NASA satellite animation shows Tropical Storm Arlene 'eaten' by weather system

An animation created by NASA using imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite shows the North Atlantic Ocean's first tropical storm of the season being "eaten" by a large frontal system.The animation from April 19 to April 22 shows Tropical...Show More Summary

Climate change clues revealed by ice sheet collapse

The rapid decline of ancient ice sheets could help scientists predict the impact of modern-day climate and sea-level change, according to research by the universities of Stirling in Scotland and Tromsø in Norway.

Want to boost the domestic gas industry? Put a price on carbon

Australia's gas industry is under scrutiny from the competition watchdog after apparently failing to deliver on its pledge to bring down domestic prices and ease the east coast gas supply crisis.

Little Ice Age displaced the tropical rain belt

The tropical rain belt, also known as the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), is in a state of constant migration. It continuously changes position in response to the seasons and follows the sun's zenith, with a slight delay. This in turn determines the wet and dry periods in the tropics and subtropics over the course of the year. Show More Summary

Scientists document coral loss and slow signs of recovery in the Central Pacific

Nearly one year after prolonged high ocean temperatures caused devastating coral bleaching and loss in parts of Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, NOAA scientists recently went back to check on their condition.

Researchers investigate the ocean's deep biosphere

Bundled in layers of blankets for warmth, Laura Zinke settled in for a two-hour ride to the bottom of the ocean. The temperature dipped significantly once she and her colleagues passed the depth still touched by sunlight, and it would...Show More Summary

Community reluctantly bidding farewell to 600-year-old tree

For hundreds of years, an imposing white oak tree has watched over a New Jersey community and a church, providing protection from the blazing summer sun, serving as a scenic backdrop for thousands of photos and—according to legend—was a picnic site for George Washington.

Spain's Canary Islands battles slick after ferry accident

Spanish coast guard crews worked Sunday to clean up a three-kilometre (1.9-mile) long diesel slick off the holiday island of Gran Canaria after a passenger ferry slammed into a pier.

USGS finds vast reserves of salty water underground

A new nationwide study has unearthed the huge hidden potential of tapping into salty aquifers as a way to relieve the growing pressure on freshwater supplies across the United States.

Proposed cuts in US climate science reverberate worldwide

The gutting of US-funded climate science would cripple research agendas worldwide and hamper the global fight against climate change, say scientists outside the United States, some of whom will take to the streets Saturday to make that point.

NASA and NOAA satellites watch Arlene, first Atlantic Tropical Storm of the season

The first tropical storm of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season formed 40 days before the official kick off of the season. Tropical Storm Arlene formed in the North Central Atlantic Ocean and NOAA's GOES-East satellite provided forecasters with a look at the storm, swirling far from land areas.

Britain could see its first full day without coal

Britain's National Grid says Friday may be the first full 24-hour work-day since the Industrial Revolution in which the nation doesn't depend on electricity generated from coal.

Cold snap threatens French vines

A late spring frost that hit French vineyards is threatening the harvest in Champagne and Burgundy, winegrowers warn.

New test to reveal pesticide exposure

A recent study provides new information that may help researchers monitor the effects of common agricultural chemicals on farmers' health.

Paris soil carbon sequestration goals called unrealistic

The goal to offset rises in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations by increasing soil carbon storage by 4 per mille (0.4%) per year is unrealistic, say scientists from The Netherlands, The United Kingdom and the United States in an opinion piece in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Making bins more convenient boosts recycling and composting rates

Want to recycle or compost more? Try moving the bins closer, new UBC research suggests.

Image: Lake MacKay, Australia captured by Copernicus Sentinel-2B

Brown hills speckle the eastern part of Australia's Lake MacKay in this satellite image.

Video: Larsen-C ice shelf crack

The Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellite mission is monitoring the growing crack in Antarctica's Larsen-C ice shelf. When the ice shelf breaks off or 'calves', it will create one of the largest icebergs ever recorded – but exactly how long this will take is difficult to predict.

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