Blog Profile / Physorg: Earth


URL :http://phys.org/earth-news/
Filed Under:Issues & Causes / Environmentalism
Posts on Regator:2045
Posts / Week:71.5
Archived Since:September 5, 2016

Blog Post Archive

Crop-destroying armyworm caterpillars spread to Uganda

A plague of crop-destroying fall armyworm caterpillars has spread to East Africa where officials confirmed their presence for the first time in Uganda on Friday.

Trump approves Keystone XL pipeline, hails 'great day' for jobs

True to his pledge, President Donald Trump gave final approval on Friday for TransCanada to build the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline, overriding environmental concerns in favor of boosting jobs and energy supply.

Land-based microbes may be invading and harming coral reefs

A new study suggests that coral reefs—already under existential threat from global warming—may be undergoing further damage from invading bacteria and fungi coming from land-based sources, such as outfall from sewage treatment plants and coastal inlets. Show More Summary

Geologist for Shell says company hid Nigeria spill dangers

Royal Dutch Shell's Nigeria subsidiary "fiercely opposed" environmental testing and is concealing data showing thousands of Nigerians are exposed to health hazards from a stalled cleanup of the worst oil spills in the West African nation's history, according to a German geologist contracted by the Dutch-British multinational.

Image: Rome captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite

Rome and its surroundings are pictured in this image from the Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite, captured on 17 January 2016.

Novel oil spill cleanup technology successfully tested

Tests conducted last week of a novel technology that can greatly accelerate the combustion of crude oil floating on water demonstrated its potential to become an effective tool for minimizing the environmental impact of future oil spills. Show More Summary

Chance find has big implications for water treatment's costs and carbon footprint

A type of bacteria accidentally discovered during research supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) could fundamentally re-shape efforts to cut the huge amount of electricity consumed during wastewater clean-up.

Steep rise of the Bernese Alps

The striking north face of the Bernese Alps is the result of a steep rise of rocks from the depths following a collision of two tectonic plates. This steep rise gives new insight into the final stage of mountain building and provides important knowledge with regard to active natural hazards and geothermal energy. Show More Summary

Rocks that tell our industrial history

Researchers in the UPV/EHU's Department of Analytical Chemistry have published a study in which they analyse cemented sand formations that contain industrial waste produced as a result of metallurgical activities. These beachrocks bear witness to the impact of industrial development and its influence on the coastal environment.

Mitigating global warming by CO2 storage? Check for continental stress

If proposed CO2 sites are not properly assessed for long-term stability, future civilisations could still suffer the consequences of global warming.

Managing bushfires for safety and biodiversity

People have long used planned fires as a tool to open up access to hunting grounds, to encourage new plant growth, and to cultivate plants for cooking, heating and spiritual purposes.

Winds and sea ice

It is thought that wind changes over the Southern Ocean may have been critical in driving changes in CO2 between cold ice-world and warm-world climates.

Satellite imaging breakthrough improves ability to measure plant growth

Satellite images of Earth's plant life have been valuable for managing crops or detecting deforestation, but current methods are often contaminated by light reflected by other things like clouds, soil and snow. Now, researchers at Stanford...Show More Summary

Kaikoura quake may prompt rethink of earthquake hazard models internationally

Last November's magnitude 7.8 Kaikoura earthquake was so complex and unusual that it is likely to lead to changes in the way scientists think about earthquake hazards in plate boundary zones worldwide, a new study says.

Another reason to flip the off switch: light pollution

For the 11th year running, cities worldwide will turn their lights off Saturday to mark Earth Hour in a global call to action on climate change.

A round-trip flight just for the view—the Southern Lights

They took an eight-hour flight just to look out the airplane's window, but it was an extraordinary view.

NASA examines Peru's deadly rainfall

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM constellation of satellites provide data on precipitation rates and totals. Recently the GPM core observatory measured the heavy rainfall that caused extensive flooding and loss of life in Peru.

A 'carbon law' offers pathway to halve emissions every decade, say researchers

On the eve of this year's Earth hour (25 March), researchers propose a solution in the journal Science for the global economy to rapidly reduce carbon emissions. The authors argue a carbon roadmap, driven by a simple rule of thumb or "carbon law" of halving emissions every decade, could catalyse disruptive innovation.

Climate change and an 'overlooked' nutrient: silica

Among ecologists, carbon gets all the glory. Scientists examine its critical role in plant growth and decay, they chart its contributions to greenhouse gases, and they measure its sequestration in earth, sea, and sky.

Corals die as global warming collides with local weather in the South China Sea

In the South China Sea, a 2°C rise in the sea surface temperature in June 2015 was amplified to produce a 6°C rise on Dongsha Atoll, a shallow coral reef ecosystem, killing approximately 40 percent of the resident coral community within weeks, according to a study published in Scientific Reports this week.

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