Blog Profile / Physorg: Nanotechnology


URL :http://phys.org/nanotech-news/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:945
Posts / Week:15
Archived Since:September 5, 2016

Blog Post Archive

Borophene shines alone as 2-D plasmonic material

An atom-thick film of boron could be the first pure two-dimensional material able to emit visible and near-infrared light by activating its plasmons, according to Rice University scientists.

Clothing fabric keeps you cool in the heat

(Phys.org)—Researchers have designed a thermal regulation textile that has a 55% greater cooling effect than cotton, which translates to cooler skin temperatures when wearing clothes made of the new fabric. The material can be fabricated using 3D printing and could provide a simple, low-cost way to cool the human body and reduce the need for air conditioning on hot days.

Researchers study the surfaces of ceria nanoparticles

At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), scientists have studied ceria nanoparticles with the help of probe molecules and a complex ultrahigh vacuum-infrared measurement system and obtained new insights into their surface structure and chemical activity. Their work is reported in three articles published in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

A simple technique for mass producing ultrathin, high-quality molybdenum trioxide nanosheets

Molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) has potential as an important two-dimensional (2-D) material, but its bulk manufacture has lagged behind that of others in its class. Now, researchers at ASTAR have developed a simple method for mass producing ultrathin, high-quality MoO3 nanosheets.

Filtration of nanoparticles from traffic should become a key criterion of building ventilation

Air filters that efficiently expel nanoparticles should be adopted in buildings. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Tampere University of Technology (TUT) have developed a comparison technique which has detected marked differences between the nanoparticle-capturing performance of air filters.

Breakthrough discovery in diagnostic tools that can replace commonly used and fragile antibodies

Experts from the Biotechnology Group at the University of Leicester led by Professor Sergey Piletsky in collaboration with the spin-off company MIP Diagnostics Ltd have announced the development of polymeric materials with molecular recognition capabilities which hold the potential to outperform natural antibodies in various diagnostic applications

Researchers compute unprecedented values for spin lifetime anisotropy in graphene

Researchers of the ICN2 Theoretical and Computational Nanoscience Group, led by ICREA Prof. Stephan Roche, have published another paper on spin, this time reporting numerical simulations for spin relaxation in graphene/TMDC heterostructures. Show More Summary

Researchers tune optical and photocatalytic properties of C-dots

As Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich physicists demonstrate in a new study, the optical and photocatalytic properties of so-called carbon dots can be precisely tuned by controlling the positions of nitrogen atoms introduced into their structure.

Three-dimensional nanomagnets for the computer of tomorrow

Since the late 1960's, electronic devices have stored and transmitted information (bits) in two-dimensional circuits. Now, researchers at the University of Cambridge have created a nanoscale magnetic circuit capable of moving information through three-dimensional space. Show More Summary

Stretching to perfection of 2-D semiconductors

Compressing a semiconductor to bring atoms closer together or stretching it to move them farther apart can dramatically change how electricity flows and how light is emitted. Scientists found an innovative way to compress or stretchShow More Summary

Butterfly wing inspires photovoltaics: Light absorption can be enhanced by up to 200 percent

Sunlight reflected by solar cells is lost as unused energy. The wings of the butterfly Pachliopta aristolochiae are drilled by nanostructures (nanoholes) that help absorbing light over a wide spectrum far better than smooth surfaces....Show More Summary

New mirror reflects light differently than conventional mirrors

(Phys.org)—Researchers have designed a new type of mirror that reflects light in a completely different way than conventional mirrors do. The new mirror, called a chiral meta-mirror, has potential applications for information processing with light, next-generation 3-D movies, and other technologies that manipulate light in novel ways.

Graphene water filter turns whisky clear

Previously graphene-oxide membranes were shown to be completely impermeable to all solvents except for water. However, a study published in Nature Materials, now shows that we can tailor the molecules that pass through these membranes by simply making them ultrathin.

Zipping DNA

ETH researchers have developed a method that allows large amounts of genetic information to be compressed and then decompressed again in cells. This could aid in the development of new therapies.

Graphene tests set for zero-G flight

After a long summer of hard work in the laboratories, researchers in the Graphene Flagship are ready for two experiments this week, testing graphene technologies for space-related applications in collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA).

Semiconductors with an aligned interface

The electronic characteristics of an interface between two wide bandgap semiconductors are determined by researchers at KAUST: an insight that will help improve the efficiency of light-emitting and high-power electronic devices.

Factors in the fabrication of heterojunctions of 2-D materials through CVD

2-D materials have special lattice structures. Atoms in the same layer are usually bound by a covalent bond, while the force between layers is van der Waals coupling. They have super-clean surfaces without any dangling bonds. Thus, the design of heterojunctions is more flexible when 2-D materials are utilized to constitute heterojunctions. Show More Summary

How the magnetoelastic effect can control the magnetic properties of nanoelements

Rapidly modifying magnetic properties is key for low power magnetic devices. The EU-funded MULTIREV project has contributed to a study which exploits magnetoelastic coupling, for the design of strain-controlled nano-devices.

Theranostic nanoparticles for tracking and monitoring disease state

Although the most basic definition of a "theranostic" nanoparticle is a nanoparticle that simply has a therapeutic moiety and imaging or diagnostic moiety on the same particle, the authors of a new SLAS Technology review article payShow More Summary

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC