Blog Profile / Physorg: Physics


URL :http://phys.org/physics-news/
Filed Under:Academics / Physics
Posts on Regator:2208
Posts / Week:35.2
Archived Since:September 5, 2016

Blog Post Archive

Strain-free epitaxy of germanium film on mica

Germanium, an elemental semiconductor, was the material of choice in the early history of electronic devices, before it was largely replaced by silicon. But due to its high charge carrier mobility—higher than silicon by threefold—the semiconductor is making a comeback.

Researchers reveal jamming in cellular motor protein traffic

To keep a cell alive, molecular motor proteins constantly transport building blocks and waste across the cell, along its biopolymer network. Because of the high density of these proteins, jamming effects are believed to affect this transport, just like traffic jams affect street traffic. Show More Summary

Researchers tunnel to a new light source

With concerns over moving to a clean energy platform worldwide with electric vehicles and renewables, wasted energy is a factor as important as the amount of green energy produced. Thus, solid-state lighting based upon light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is touted as a solution. Show More Summary

New imaging technique peers inside living cells

To undergo high-resolution imaging, cells often must be sliced and diced, dehydrated, painted with toxic stains, or embedded in resin. For cells, the result is certain death.

Carefully crafted light pulses control neuron activity

Specially tailored, ultrafast pulses of light can trigger neurons to fire and could one day help patients with light-sensitive circadian or mood problems, according to a new study in mice at the University of Illinois.

Scientists invent technique to map energy and momentum of electrons beneath a material's surface

For the first time, physicists have developed a technique that can peer deep beneath the surface of a material to identify the energies and momenta of electrons there.

Nano-'hashtags' could be the key to generating the highly sought Majorana quasiparticle

UC Santa Barbara scientists are on the cusp of a major advance in topological quantum computing.

The stacked color sensor

Red-sensitive, blue-sensitive and green-sensitive color sensors stacked on top of each other instead of being lined up in a mosaic pattern – this principle could allow image sensors with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity to light to be created. Show More Summary

NIST's next-generation atomic clocks may support official timekeeping

For more than a decade, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been unveiling experimental next-generation atomic clocks. These clocks, based on ytterbium, strontium, aluminum, and mercury atoms, among others, have set records for precision and stability.

Researcher sketches a path toward quantum computing

As new devices move quantum computing closer to practical use, the journal Nature recently asked Princeton computer scientist Margaret Martonosi and two colleagues to assess the state of software needed to exploit this powerful computational approach.

Spinning cylinders to recreate nature's patterns

Some of nature's most exquisite patterns; leaves around a plant's stem, scales on a pine cone, and the tail of some viruses, consist of small objects decorating a cylindrical chassis with a specific pattern. Nature's preferred method...Show More Summary

Porpoises found to shift forehead tissue to fine-tune sonar signals

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers in China has solved the mystery of how porpoises are able to locate tiny prey using sonar with wavelengths that seem too large to be of much use in such applications. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Applied, the group explains studying the sonar signal-generating parts of porpoise anatomy and what they found by doing so.

Low-energy X-rays surprisingly effective at killing bacterial spores, offering improved sterilization techniques

Low-energy X-rays are able to sterilize materials, offering a potentially cheap and effective alternative to current techniques, ASTAR researchers have shown.

Magnetic skyrmions found to hold the potential of storing electronic data

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from the U.S., Germany and China has found that magnetic skyrmions could one day be used as a means of storing electronic data. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters,...Show More Summary

Micro-spectroscopy opens new routes for diagnostics

Just as mechanical properties and chemical compositions of materials are of fundamental importance in buildings, the cells that comprise every living organism have different properties and shapes depending on their function and state. Show More Summary

What is the computational power of the universe?

Can a close look at the universe give us solutions to problems too difficult even for a planet-sized computer to solve?

Model sheds new light on pathogen cooperation

New approaches are needed to control the spread of epidemic diseases, according to the developers of a new model of the way pathogens can 'cooperate'.

Hunt for dark matter is narrowed by new research

Scientists at the University of Sussex have disproved the existence of a specific type of axion - an important candidate 'dark matter' particle - across a wide range of its possible masses.

Microscopic structures for vibration-resistant plugs

Everyone has probably had a problem with loose contacts at some point. Electronic equipment malfunctioning is often caused by poor plug connections. In particular in the automotive industry, where electronics are increasingly being used, the quality of plug contacts plays a pivotal role – and this where materials science can come in. Show More Summary

Researchers report novel collision-based computing technique

Researchers have published a paper that demonstrations the first laboratory experiment to use liquid marbles to create collision-based computation in research.

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