Blog Profile / Physorg: Astronomy


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Filed Under:Academics / Astronomy
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Archived Since:September 5, 2016

Blog Post Archive

Work on China's mission to Mars 'well underway'

China's programme to launch a mission to Mars in 2020 is "well underway", its top planner said Wednesday as the country moves forward with its ambitious space programme.

Puerto Rican astronaut affected by double hurricanes

The International Space Station's Joe Acaba (AH-kah-bah), the first astronaut of Puerto Rican heritage, has been affected by two hurricanes—even in orbit.

Space radiation is risky business for the human body

While people protect their eyes from the sun's radiation during a solar eclipse, NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is working to protect the whole human body from radiation in space. Space radiation is dangerous and one of the primary health risks for astronauts.

Keeping astronauts – and Earth – safe from destructive solar storms

Space enthusiasts are invited to become scientists to help identify massive solar eruptions by watching video clips recorded in space.

Image: Northern Lights over Canada from the ISS

The spectacular aurora borealis, or the "northern lights," over Canada is sighted from the International Space Station near the highest point of its orbital path. The station's main solar arrays are seen in the left foreground.

Ageing star blows off smoky bubble

Astronomers have used ALMA to capture a strikingly beautiful view of a delicate bubble of expelled material around the exotic red star U Antliae. These observations will help astronomers to better understand how stars evolve during the later stages of their life-cycles.

Possible explanation for the galaxy's cosmic radiation

Cassiopeia A is a famous supernova remnant, the product of a gigantic explosion of a massive star about 350 years ago. Although discovered in radio observations 50 years ago, we now know that its emitted radiation spans from radio through high-energy gamma rays. Show More Summary

Scientists have invented a new way to weigh intergalactic black holes

Astrophysicists from Moscow State University have found a new way to estimate the mass of supermassive black holes outside our galaxy, even if they are barely detectable. The results of the study were published in Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Giant antennas in New Mexico search for cosmic discoveries

Employing an array of giant telescopes positioned in the New Mexico desert, astronomers have started a massive surveying project aimed at producing the most detailed view ever made of such a large portion of space using radio waves emitted from throughout the Milky Way and beyond.

New research suggests Mercury's poles are icier than scientists thought

The scorching hot surface of Mercury seems like an unlikely place to find ice, but research over the past three decades has suggested that water is frozen on the first rock from the sun, hidden away on crater floors that are permanently shadowed from the sun's blistering rays. Show More Summary

The cosmic water trail uncovered by Herschel

During almost four years of observing the cosmos, the Herschel Space Observatory traced out the presence of water. With its unprecedented sensitivity and spectral resolution at key wavelengths, Herschel revealed this crucial molecule...Show More Summary

NASA small satellite promises big discoveries

Small satellites provide a cheap, responsive alternative to larger, more expensive satellites. As demand grows, engineers must adapt these "nanosatellites" to provide greater data returns. NASA, in collaboration with educational partners, targets 2021 for the launch of an innovative CubeSat that addresses these challenges.

Nanosat fleet proposed for voyage to 300 asteroids

A fleet of tiny spacecraft could visit over 300 asteroids in just over three years, according to a mission study led by the Finnish Meteorological Institute. The Asteroid Touring Nanosat Fleet concept comprises 50 spacecraft propelled...Show More Summary

What do we need to know to mine an asteroid?

The mining of resources contained in asteroids, for use as propellant, building materials or in life-support systems, has the potential to revolutionise exploration of our Solar System. To make this concept a reality, we need to increase our knowledge of the very diverse population of accessible Near Earth Asteroids (NEA). Show More Summary

Size matters in the detection of exoplanet atmospheres

A group analysis of 30 exoplanets orbiting distant stars suggests that size, not mass, is a key factor in whether a planet's atmosphere can be detected. The largest population-study of exoplanets to date successfully detected atmospheres around 16 'hot Jupiters', and found that water vapour was present in every case.

A day in the life of NASA's Voyagers

At more than 10 billion miles away from Earth, there is no day and night. Time and space are fathomless and our Sun is a distant point of starlight—a faint reminder of the home NASA's twin Voyagers, humanity's farthest and longest-lived spacecraft, left behind 40 years ago. Show More Summary

What we're hoping to learn from the magnetic readings of Cassini's final orbits

It was a proud but sad moment when NASA announced that mission control had lost the signal from the Cassini spacecraft on September 15. As it takes the signal over an hour to travel from Saturn to Earth, this meant that the spacecraft had already been destroyed in Saturn's atmosphere.

New quasar discovered by astronomers

(Phys.org)—A team of astronomers led by Jacob M. Robertson of the Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, Tennessee has detected a new quasi-stellar object (QSO). They found the new quasar, designated SDSS J022155.26-064916.6, as a result of an analysis of available spectroscopic data. The finding is reported in a paper published Sept. 10 on the arXiv pre-print server.

Expect the unexpected from the big-data boom in radio astronomy

Radio astronomy is undergoing a major boost, with new technology gathering data on objects in our universe faster than astronomers can analyse.

Solar wind impacts on giant 'space hurricanes' may affect satellite safety

Could the flapping of a butterfly's wings in Costa Rica set off a hurricane in California? The question has been scrutinized by chaos theorists, stock-market analysts and weather forecasters for decades. For most people, this hypothetical scenario may be difficult to imagine on Earth - particularly when a real disaster strikes.

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