Blog Profile / Physorg: Biology


URL :http://phys.org/biology-news/
Filed Under:Academics / Biology
Posts on Regator:5910
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Archived Since:September 5, 2016

Blog Post Archive

Twisted sex allows mirror-image snails to mate face-to-face, research finds

A study led by the University of Nottingham has found that differently-coiled types of Japanese land snails should in fact be considered a single species, because - against all odds - they are sometimes able to mate, a result which has implications for the classification of other snails.

Chimp females who leave home postpone parenthood

New moms need social support, and mother chimpanzees are no exception. So much so that female chimps that lack supportive friends and family wait longer to start having babies, according to researchers who have combed through the records of Jane Goodall's famous Gombe chimpanzees.

Robotic device tracks plant growth at the cellular level

Determining how various treatments and conditions affect the mechanical properties of plant cells could allow scientists to understand plant growth at the cellular level and devise ways to enhance it. In a breakthrough report published...Show More Summary

Albatross populations in decline from fishing and environmental change

The populations of wandering, black-browed and grey-headed albatrosses have halved over the last 35 years on sub-antarctic Bird Island according to a new study published today (20 November) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The strange case of the scuba-diving fly

More than a century ago, American writer Mark Twain observed a curious phenomenon at Mono Lake, just to the east of Yosemite National Park: enormous numbers of small flies would crawl underwater to forage and lay eggs, but each time they resurfaced, they would appear completely dry.

Light green plants save nitrogen without sacrificing photosynthetic efficiency

The top leaves of crops absorb far more light than they can use, starving lower leaves of light. Scientists designed plants with light green leaves with hopes of allowing more light to penetrate the crop canopy and increase overall light use efficiency and yield. Show More Summary

How antibiotic use in animals is contributing to antibiotic resistance

The overuse of veterinary antibiotics in animal production and the subsequent land applications of manure contribute to increased antibiotic resistance in soil. A new review published in the European Journal of Soil Science examinesShow More Summary

What makes soil, soil? Researchers find hidden clues in DNA

Ever wondered what makes a soil, soil? And could soil from the Amazon rainforest really be the same as soil from your garden?

Diabetes drug helps repair UV-damaged DNA in cells of 'Moon children'

The severe and debilitating genetic disease Xeroderma pigmentosum impedes cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. Scientists from CeMM found a drug approved for diabetes treatment to alleviate the impact of the gene defect in cell culture, which led to the discovery of a previously unknown DNA repair mechanism. The study was published in Molecular Cell.

Creative management of grazing through the use small fires

Creative management of grazing through the use small fires can draw back herbivores to grazing areas that are avoided by animals.

Uncovering essential enzymes for plant growth during nitrogen starvation

A study led by researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) has found that two key enzymes in plants called PAH1 and PAH2 are critical for survival and growth under nitrogen-depleted conditions. The study sheds new light on how plants could be modified in future to boost tolerance to nutrient-poor environments.

Fixated on food?

Contrast has an impact on the optokinetic reflex, which enables us to clearly perceive the landscape from a moving train. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown that visual features that modulate this ability are encoded in the retina.

Growing cannabis with modern science and technology

In Canada and around the world, legal cannabis producers face many challenges: varying government regulations, high security requirements and a lack of reliable information on how to grow their crops.

What genes and genomes reveal about our health

But unlike magic crystal balls, our genome can reveal some actual facts about our inner workings.

What makes tissue soft and yet so tough

Engineers at ETH Zurich have discovered that soft biological tissue deforms very differently under tension than previously assumed. Their findings are already being put to use in medical research projects.

Study shows plant growth regulators can benefit onion establishment, production

A study by researchers at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Uvalde shows the use of externally introduced plant growth regulators can have a positive effect on onion germination and root structure.

Tiger bones? Lion bones? An almost extinct cycad? On-the-spot DNA checks at ports of entry

Wildlife traffickers do their best to make animal and plant parts unidentifiable. When customs officials find bones, maybe all they can say, is that the bones belonged to large cats. Then they have to ask: are those tiger bones? Tigers are threatened with extinction and an international convention (CITES) forbids any trade of any parts. Show More Summary

Research reveals a new survival strategy in key bacteria

New research shows that a bacteria and promising microbial cell factory will not immediately shut down when deprived of nitrogen – instead 'waiting' until absolutely necessary to stop functioning.

Recovery of West Coast marine mammals boosts consumption of chinook salmon

Recovering populations of killer whales, sea lions and harbor seals on the West Coast have dramatically increased their consumption of chinook salmon in the last 40 years, which may now exceed the combined harvest by commercial and recreational fisheries, a new study finds.

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