Blog Profile / Physorg: Chemistry


URL :http://phys.org/chemistry-news/
Filed Under:Academics / Chemistry
Posts on Regator:2437
Posts / Week:33.9
Archived Since:September 5, 2016

Blog Post Archive

Persistent photoconductivity used to stimulate neurotypic cells

Researchers have, for the first time, used a material's persistent photoconductivity to stimulate neurotype cells. The technique, which is relatively simple, should facilitate future research on using charge to influence cellular behavior.

Electrons in the water

It's a popular tradition to throw coins into fountains in the hopes of having wishes granted. But what would happen if you could "throw" electrons into the water instead? That is, what happens shortly after an electron is injected into water?

New fuel cell technology runs on solid carbon

Advancements in a fuel cell technology powered by solid carbon could make electricity generation from resources such as coal and biomass cleaner and more efficient, according to a new paper published by Idaho National Laboratory researchers.

Bio-renewable process could help 'green' plastic

When John Wesley Hyatt patented the first industrial plastic in 1869, his intention was to create an alternative to the elephant tusk ivory used to make piano keys. But this early plastic also sparked a revolution in the way people thought about manufacturing: What if we weren't limited to the materials nature had to offer?

Simulations show how atoms behave inside self-healing cement

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed a self-healing cement that could repair itself in as little as a few hours. Wellbore cement for geothermal applications has a life-span of only 30 to 40 years. Show More Summary

Lifespan of fuel cells maximized using small amount of metals

Fuel cells are a key future energy technology emerging as eco-friendly and renewable energy sources. In particular, solid oxide fuel cells composed of ceramic materials can directly convert fuels such as biomass, LNG, and LPG to electric energy. Show More Summary

Researchers discover new enzymes central to cell function

Doctors have long treated heart attacks, improved asthma symptoms, and cured impotence by increasing levels of a single molecule in the body: nitric oxide.

Army researchers make explosive discovery

Scientists from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory found a solution to a significant challenge in making high-energy explosives. They safely improved the overall chemical yield derived from diaminoglyoxime, known as DAG, and significantly increased the amount of material made per reaction.

A new polymer raises the bar for lithium-sulfur batteries

Lithium-sulfur batteries are promising candidates for replacing common lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles since they are cheaper, weigh less, and can store nearly double the energy for the same mass. However, lithium-sulfur batteries become unstable over time, and their electrodes deteriorate, limiting widespread adoption.

Detecting chemical agents with confidence

The Joint Chemical Agent Detector (JCAD) has become an important defense tool on battlefields and in war-torn cities over the last few years. About the size and shape of a VHS tape or a hardcover bestselling novel, JCADs sound an alarm and begin to light up if nerve agents such as sarin or blister agents such as mustard gas are present.

Looking to the sun to create hydrogen fuel

When Lawrence Livermore scientist Tadashi Ogitsu leased a hydrogen fuel-cell car in 2017, he knew that his daily commute would change forever. There are no greenhouse gases that come out of the tailpipe, just a bit of water vapor.

Researchers make advances in control of chameleon-like material for next-generation computers

Researchers from Texas A&M University report significant advances in their understanding and control of a chameleon-like material that could be key to next-generation computers that are even more powerful than today's silicon-based machines.

The early bits of life

How can life originate before DNA and genes? One possibility is that there are natural processes that lead to the organisation of simple physical objects such as small microcapsules that undergo rudimentary forms of interaction, self-organisation and information processing.

Popular tool for drug discovery just got 10 times faster

Researchers at Purdue University just made high throughput screening, a process often used in drug discovery, 10 times faster than previous methods.

The chemical evolution of DNA and RNA on early Earth

RNA was probably the first informational molecule. Now, chemists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have demonstrated that alternation of wet and dry conditions could have sufficed to drive the prebiotic synthesis of the RNA nucleosides found in all domains of life.

Chemists improve hydrogen sensors

A group of scientists from the Siberian Federal University (SFU, Krasnoyarsk, Russia) and the Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry (NIIC, Novosibirsk, Russia) have combined the useful properties of metal phthalocyanines and palladium membranes in order to create active layers in hydrogen detectors. Show More Summary

Novel chip-based gene expression tool analyzes RNA quickly and accurately

A University of Illinois and Mayo collaboration has demonstrated a novel gene expression analysis technique that can accurately measure levels of RNA quickly and directly from a cancerous tissue sample while preserving the spatial information across the tissue —something that conventional methods cannot do. Show More Summary

New research could significantly accelerate drug discovery

Many drugs work by inhibiting protein enzymes associated with a particular disease. Unfortunately, the same drugs can inhibit protein enzymes unrelated to the disease, resulting in harmful side effects. One potential solution is to better identify structural features that determine a protein enzyme's function.

Researchers discover structure of anti-aging hormone

A new study reveals the molecular structure of a protein called alpha(?)Klotho, and how it helps to transmit a hormonal signal that slows aging.

Semiconductor breakthrough may be game-changer for organic solar cells

In an advance that could push cheap, ubiquitous solar power closer to reality, University of Michigan researchers have found a way to coax electrons to travel much further than was previously thought possible in the materials often used for organic solar cells and other organic semiconductors.

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