Blog Profile / HeritageDaily: Archaeology


URL :http://www.heritagedaily.com/category/archaeology-news
Filed Under:Academics / Archaeology
Posts on Regator:77
Posts / Week:2.3
Archived Since:September 5, 2016

Blog Post Archive

World War One Battlefield Tunnels Discovered Under Salisbury Plain

Archaeologists working in Wiltshire have identified a unique network of First World War tunnels under Salisbury Plain.

Digital app brings to life one of Scotland’s key prehistoric settlement sites

A new online digital resource has been launched to bring to life one of Scotland's most important prehistoric settlement landscapes.

Medieval priest discovered in elaborate grave 700 years after his death

The remains of a medieval priest who died 700 years ago have been uncovered in an elaborate grave.

Precision chronology sheds new light on the origins of Mongolia’s nomadic horse culture

According to new research, nomadic horse culture -- famously associated with Genghis Khan and his Mongol hordes -- can trace its roots back more than 3,000 years in the eastern Eurasian Steppes, in the territory of modern Mongolia.

We’re closer to learning when humans first daubed arrows with poison

Exactly when did human beings start tipping their weapons with poison to hunt prey? This is a question at the forefront of recent archaeological research.

Prehistoric alpine farming in the Bernese Oberland

The people in Switzerland were on the move in the High Alps and running alpine pastures 7,000 years ago and therefore much earlier than previously assumed. A study by the University of Bern that combines archaeological knowledge with findings from palaeoecology comes to this conclusion. Prehistoric finds from the Schnidejoch Pass played a crucial part in this.

New archaeological evidence throws light on efforts to resist ‘the living dead’

A new scientific study of medieval human bones, excavated from a deserted English village, suggests the corpses they came from were burnt and mutilated. Researchers from the University of Southampton and Historic England believe this was carried out by villagers who believed that it would stop the corpses rising from their graves and menacing the living.

Steppe migrant thugs pacified by Stone Age farming women

Research suggests that large demographic changes during the first part of the Bronze Age happened as a result of massive migrations of Yamnaya people from the Pontic-Caspian steppes into Neolithic Europe. They were also able to show that plague was widespread in both Europe and Central Asia at this time.

Egyptian ritual images from the Neolithic period

Egyptologists at the University of Bonn discovered rock art from the 4th millennium BC during an excavation at a necropolis near Aswan in Egypt.

Uncovered after 2,000 years: gold torcs fit for an Iron Age queen

Found by two metal detectorists in a Staffordshire field, the Leekfrith torcs are a spectacular example of late Iron Age jewellery and show just how skilled the pre-Roman inhabitants of Britain were in metalwork. But the torcs are not just beautiful and valuable objects, they also help archaeologists understand how Iron Age society worked.

Where were all the women in the Stone Age?

Were there any women around in the Palaeolithic Era? If popular culture is any guide you’d think not. And even archaeology itself has a long way to go to address a deeply ingrained bias towards men.

The toy Viking boat that sailed the seas of time

A thousand years ago, for reasons we will never know, the residents of a tiny farmstead on the coast of central Norway filled an old well with dirt.

Puzzle of the Maya pendant

To say that UC San Diego archaeologist Geoffrey Braswell was surprised to discover a precious jewel in Nim Li Punit in southern Belize is something of an understatement.

38,000-year-old engravings confirm ancient origins of technique used by Seurat, Van Gogh

A newly discovered trove of 16 engraved and otherwise modified limestone blocks, created 38,000 years ago, confirms the ancient origins of the pointillist techniques later adopted by 19th and 20th century artists such as Georges Seurat, Vincent Van Gogh, Camille Pissarro, and Roy Lichtenstein.

Radiocarbon dating and DNA show ancient Puebloan leadership in the maternal line

Discovering who was a leader, or even if leaders existed, from the ruins of archaeological sites is difficult, but now a team of archaeologists and biological anthropologists, using a powerful combination of radiocarbon dating and ancient DNA, have shown that a matrilineal dynasty likely ruled Pueblo Bonito in New Mexico for more than 300 years.

The Carnoustie Bronze Age Hoard

GUARD Archaeologists, working on behalf of Angus Council in advance of the construction of two football pitches at Carnoustie in Angus in Scotland, have recently discovered a major addition to Scottish Late Bronze Age archaeology.

Space Archaeologist Dr. Sarah Parcak Launches Her TED Prize Wish: GlobalXplorer

Dr. Sarah Parcak, a space archaeologist has officially launched the GlobalXplorer: a citizen science and archaeology platform that’s enlisting people around the world to discover sites unknown to modern archaeologists.

Relief road provides glimpse into past Roman and Iron Age communities, settlements and landscapes in the area.

Preliminary works for a relief road in Lincolnshire have provided a fascinating glimpse into past Roman and Iron Age communities, settlements and landscapes in the area.

Archaeologists Find 12th Dead Sea Scrolls Cave

Hebrew University archaeologists working near the Dead Sea have found a cave that previously contained Dead Sea scrolls, which were looted in the middle of the 20th Century. Scholars now suggest the cave should be numbered as Cave 12, along with the 11 caves previously known to have housed hidden Dead Sea scrolls.

Roman house with ornate mosaic and hypercaust discovered in Leicester

Archaeologists have uncovered a fantastic Roman mosaic and evidence of good living over 1,500 years ago in Leicester city centre in a home with underfloor heating.

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