Blog Profile / LA Times: Science


URL :http://www.latimes.com/science/
Filed Under:Academics
Posts on Regator:456
Posts / Week:7
Archived Since:September 14, 2016

Blog Post Archive

Cassini may be dead, but a new era of Saturn science has just begun

NASA’s Cassini mission to Saturn may have came to a fiery end in September, but observations made by the spacecraft in its final months still have plenty to teach us about the mysteries of the ringed planet. Case in point: A new study finds that the electrically charged region of Saturn’s atmosphere,...

In the face of a threat, narwhals respond in just about the worst possible way

Narwhals can’t pick whether to freeze or flee after being caught in human hunting nets – and that reaction can put them in grave danger, according to a new study of the marine mammals. The discovery, described in the journal Science, has implications for the vulnerability of these mammals as they...

Add at least 57 to the number of gun-related deaths tied to the Sandy Hook mass shooting

One little-known fact about mass shootings is that they have been very good for the gun business. Americans’ anxieties are stoked both by the random violence itself and the ensuing debates over gun control. Customers, including some who’ve never owned a gun, race to buy weapons they fear may be...

This weird, water-loving dinosaur has claws like a velociraptor and a neck like a goose

Scientists have discovered a duck-like new dinosaur species with a swan neck and flippered forelimbs. It spent at least some time living in water.

Widespread screening for breast cancer didn't do much to save women's lives, study finds

Breast cancer deaths have declined markedly in the Netherlands since a nationwide screening program began in 1989, but mammograms deserve little — if any — of the credit, a new study suggests. In fact, the main impact of inviting Dutch women between the ages of 50 and 74 to get a mammogram every...

FDA's program to speed up drug approval shaved nearly a year off the process

Speeding the pace at which potentially lifesaving drugs are brought to market was a rallying cry for Donald Trump as a candidate, and is a stated priority of his Food and Drug Administration commissioner, Dr. Scott Gottlieb. But a new study finds that programs already in place were routinely shortening...

Early-life stress, especially in war, can have consequences across multiple generations

The wartime evacuation of Finnish children more than 70 years ago might have been an historical footnote, its cost to human health and happiness lost in the passage of time. More than 70,000 Finnish children were separated from their parents in a frantic rout and whisked away to institutions and...

These 215 fossil pterosaur eggs are revealing new clues about these mysterious flying reptiles

An invaluable collection of 215 eggs - including 16 that contain embroys - is providing new insights into the development and nesting habits of pterosaurs.

Mars may not have the water we thought it did, study shows

When it comes to signs of flowing water on Mars, planetary scientists might be getting left high and dry. New research reveals that mysterious dark streaks long thought to be signs of seasonal water activity might actually just be caused by dry sand. The findings, described in the journal Nature...

Self-harm rises sharply among tween and young teen girls, study shows

For girls navigating the straits of adolescence and young adulthood, there are new signs of serious emotional trouble. From 2009 to 2015, the nation’s emergency rooms saw a sharp rise in treatment of girls 10 to 24 who intentionally injured themselves. But inside that increasing trend of girls...

Meet 'Oumuamua, the interstellar asteroid, before it's gone for good

Astronomers have spotted an unprecedented interplanetary traveler: an asteroid-like object that came from far beyond our own solar system. The discovery of ‘Oumuamua, described in the journal Nature, marks the first time that researchers have identified an interstellar object — and it could mean...

For opiate addiction, study finds drug-assisted treatment is more effective than detox

Say you’re a publicly-insured Californian with an addiction to heroin, fentanyl or prescription narcotics, and you want to quit. New research suggests you can do it the way most treatment-seeking addicts in the state do — by undergoing a medically-supervised “detoxification” that’s difficult, expensive...

Scientists aim to fight climate change with super plants

The Salk Institute in La Jolla is launching a scientific initiative to develop new types of crops that can help fight climate change.

Even small black holes emit gravitational waves when they collide, and LIGO heard them

LIGO scientists say they have discovered gravitational waves coming from another black hole merger, and it’s the tiniest one they’ve ever seen. The findings, submitted to the Astrophysical Journal Letters, could shed light on the diversity of the black hole population — and may help scientists...

Just like humans, chimpanzees warn others of impending danger

Chimpanzees adjust their warning calls if they think a fellow primate hasn’t picked up on a nearby threat, a new study finds. The results, published in the journal Science Advances, reveal that humans and one of their closest living relatives may share a very special ability, one that could potentially...

This new satellite could produce the most accurate weather predictions yet

NASA has just sent the newest NOAA weather satellite into space. The Joint Polar Satellite System-1, or JPSS-1, will give the nation a powerful new tool for predicting natural disasters.

Organic agriculture can help feed the world, but only if we eat less meat and stop wasting food

Agriculture could go organic worldwide if we slashed food waste and stopped using so much cropland to feed livestock, a new study finds. The analysis, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows that it will take several strategies operating at once to feed the growing human population...

New guidelines classify nearly half of U.S. adults as having high blood pressure

New medical guidelines lower the threshold for high blood pressure, adding 30 million Americans to those who have the condition. That means now nearly half of U.S. adults have it. High blood pressure has long meant a top reading of at least 140 or a bottom one of 90. The new top reading is 130...

Scientists prove that the public pays attention to journalism

The president may be fond of complaining about “fake” news, but the truth is that journalism drives the national conversation, and science has proven it. A new study published Thursday in the journal Science demonstrates that even small news outlets can have a substantial impact on the issues Americans...

This unusually long-lasting supernova may force astronomers to rethink how stars die

Talk about going out with a bang — and then another bang. Astronomers at Las Cumbres Observatory have discovered a supernova that has defied expectations, lasting far longer than anticipated. The strange and still-going stellar explosion, described in the journal Nature, defies scientists’ understanding...

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