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2:00PM Water Cooler 2/12/2016

Today's Water Cooler: TPP, Dem debate, Clinton gold, Cruz videos, Nevada caucus, negative interest, F-35 follies, welfare for the rich

Banks Don’t Want to Work With the Legal Marijuana Industry. Can This Start-Up Convince Them?

This post originally appeared on Inc.com. Although selling marijuana is now legal in 24 states and the District of Columbia, doing business as a legal marijuana company is a logistical nightmare. That's because marijuana is still federally...Show More Summary

Russia’s Answer to Fannie Mae And Freddie Mac Aims for Mortgage-Market Boost

Russia wants to create a secondary market for mortgage-backed securities (MBS). Of course, the devil is in the details. The post Russia’s Answer to Fannie Mae And Freddie Mac Aims for Mortgage-Market Boost was originally published at The Wall Street Examiner. Follow the money!

Colorado companies experiment with on-job pot use

In Colorade, legalization of marijuana has some businesses tolerating and even encouraging employees to consume weed

Deutsche Bank: Crystallising Europe’s TBTF Problems

Deutsche Bank AG is a massive, repeat - massive - banking behemoth. And the beast is in trouble. The post Deutsche Bank: Crystallising Europe’s TBTF Problems was originally published at The Wall Street Examiner. Follow the money!

Pirates Of The Caribbean (Muni-Style): Puerto Rican Bond Yield Soars To 12.30%, CDS 5Y At 2,828

In a modern day retelling of “Pirates of the Caribbean,” Puerto Rico is in serious fiscal difficulty stemming from a declining population and overwhelming social safety nets. The post Pirates Of The Caribbean (Muni-Style): Puerto Rican Bond Yield Soars To 12.30%, CDS 5Y At 2,828 was originally published at The Wall Street Examiner. Follow the money!

The Windy City Has Reached the Boiling Point

Just as I warned investors away from Puerto Rico’s last bond offering, they should stay away from this piece of kryptonite. The post The Windy City Has Reached the Boiling Point was originally published at The Wall Street Examiner. Follow the money!

Putterman-Weil Data

(February 12, 2016 01:33 PM, by Bryan Caplan) With the authors' kind permission, here is Putterman and Weil's data in Excel format.... (0 COMMENTS)

?Thanks, millennials: Whole Foods mulling tattoo parlors

The upscale grocer is considering the move for its new 365 chain, which is aimed at younger, budget-savvy shoppers

Building common fiscal policy in the Eurozone

In order to preserve financial integration and stability, the Eurozone needs to build elements of a common fiscal policy. This column discusses how this could be done. It proposes the creation of a European Fiscal Institute, modelled on principles similar to those used for the ECB. Show More Summary

The Affordable Care Act Six Years after Passage: February 26, 2016

The affordable care act six years after passage: Hopes, Fears, Disappointment, Windfalls, and Realities (so far) Friday, February 26, 2016 :: 5:30-7:30 PM :: Thompson Courtroom, Ground Floor University of Missouri--Kansas City School of Law :: 500 E. 52nd Street :: Kansas City, MO [Videocast](http://mediasite.law.umkc.edu/Mediasite/Play/16b615abd5084bbea3cd1fa9d939847e1d)

U.S. retail sales rise amid higher wages, job gains

Gains on the labor front and sliding gas prices help loosen purse strings after a fourth-quarter slowdown

The EZ Crisis: What went wrong with the European financial integration?

The ongoing Eurozone Crisis has raised many debates on what needs to be done to reduce the frequency and severity of similar future crises. This column discusses the implications of equity versus debt flows in terms of risk sharing during the Crisis, and in terms of slow recovery in the aftermath of the Crisis. Show More Summary

Completing the Banking Union

The Eurozone’s ‘Banking Union’ created a system of banking supervision and a common institution to restructure troubled banks. There remain two issues, however, that need to be addressed:  banks are holding too much debt of their own sovereign, and deposit insurance is only backstopped at the national level. Show More Summary

Safeguarding the Euro – balancing market discipline with certainty

A lot has been achieved in terms of institution building to turn the Eurozone into a sustainable currency union. The Eurozone Crisis, however, has shown that the Eurozone is still not a properly functioning currency union. This column points to three areas of further reform to achieve such a goal. Show More Summary

Paul Krugman: On Economic Stupidity

Going "off the deep end on macroeconomic policy": On Economic Stupidity, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times:... If you’ve been following the financial news, you know that there’s a lot of market turmoil out there. It’s nothing like 2008,...

NY Fed: Household Debt Increased "Modestly" in Q4 2015, Delinquency Rates Declined

The Q4 report was released today: Household Debt and Credit Report.From the NY Fed: Household Debt Grows Modestly Household debt increased moderately and repayment rates improved during the last three months of 2015, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit. Show More Summary

(Early) Monday Smackdown: Unemployment Rate Truthers Department

The very sharp Kevin Drum gets it largely right: Kevin Drum: [U6 Is Now the Last Refuge of Scoundrels](http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2016/02/u6-now-last-refuge-scoundrels): "Tuesday Donald Trump repeated his fatuous nonsense about the real unemployment rate being 42 percent.... Show More Summary

Fixing a sovereignless currency

The euro is unique in that it is a currency without a sovereign. Since the crisis, there have been major developments towards making the Eurozone more resilient, including the banking union and the European Stability Mechanism (ESM)....Show More Summary

U.S. stocks bounce back from punishing week

Investors embrace oil's surge, with a positive report on consumer spending also helping lift sentiment

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