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Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson

On Nov. 1, 1986, Ronda Morrison, an 18-year-old white woman and college student from a respected Monroeville, Alabama, family was found dead at Monroe Cleaners, where she had worked. She had been shot three times in the back. Monroeville...Show More Summary

Bringing Back the Dead -- In Memory of Eduardo Galeano

Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com Recently, Susan Bergholz, the devoted literary agent of the late Uruguayan writer and planetary great Eduardo Galeano, sent me this brief email: "A friend of Eduardo's and mine called yesterday to tell me, 'Now we know where Eduardo went: he became pope!'" Somehow, that thought raised my spirits immeasurably. Show More Summary

‘I Am Cait’ Premiere Recap: All About Everyone Else

E!'s now show, at least in its first episode, is not meant for transgender people.

Expanded Richard Wagner Museum Opens in Bayreuth

The Wagner family's Nazi connections are highlighted on the grounds of the refurbished Richard Wagner Museum

Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere Comes Of Age In America

Neil Gaiman is undoubtedly one of the modern masters of fantasy writing. His Sandman comic book series is one of greatest of all time in the medium. The art is beautiful, the writing is intelligent, and the stories created over its seven epic years are being consumed by multiple generations of fans thanks to many reprints and collected volumes. Show More Summary

The Shore by Sara Taylor

Zakiya Harris reviews The Shore by Sara Taylor today in Rumpus Books.

Third Way

You may have heard that E.L. Doctorow passed away last week. The Ragtime and Billy Bathgate author was known for his mastery of historical fiction. At The Guardian, Michael Chabon offers a tribute, arguing that Doctorow found a way out of the binary trap between postmodernism and realism.

God's Masterpiece or the Devil's Bad Joke?

Barbarians and Apes -- from the Opium Wars to the Origin of the Species Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com [The following passages are excerpted from Eduardo Galeano’s history of humanity, Mirrors (Nation Books).] Origin of Freedom of Oppression Opium was outlawed in China. Show More Summary

Your Guide to Married Life – For Teens!

  Teen Guide to Married Life Freidrich 1989 So, what is marriage all about? Teens want to know and this is the guide! Nothing particularly earth shattering here. Basics about sharing, money management, apartments, children, etc. This is basically a plea for teens to be cautious. Despite the cover, there is very little about painting […]

Mark Twain Did Not Write Valentines!

Mark Twain is deservedly remembered for his barbed wit, for lines like these from his Notebooks: "Familiarity breeds contempt--and children." "There has been only one Christian. They caught him and crucified him--early." But every now...Show More Summary

My Travels with Harper Lee

The countdown to midnight exceeded all expectations. News trucks from Birmingham, Mobile, Pensacola, as well as major outlets like CNN, jockeyed for curb space along West Claiborne Street. Reporters flanked the throng of Lee enthusiasts, requesting interviews.

‘The Complete Stories,’ by Clarice Lispector

Clarice Lispector’s “Complete Stories” is proof that she was one of the true originals of Latin American literature.

Literate Housewife ~ Update and What I’m Reading This Week

The past few weeks have been crazy. Up until Friday evening, I hadn’t been home for a week and a half. I opted to drive to Chicago on the 15th for a work conference so that I could bring my daughters with me to celebrate my Grandma‘s life. The hours of driving time were worth […]

The Rumpus Interview with Etgar Keret

Writer Etgar Keret talks about his new memoir The Seven Good Years, the early criticism he faced as a writer, and the surreal that is always waiting.

Harlequin Films: Recipe for Revenge – A Guest Review from Erin

I was (un)fortunate enough to have had a day off sick and bought some ex-rental movies from the video place that week, and two of them were Harlequin books in movie format. Oh.  My.  God. Late nineties contemporary Harlequin in visual...Show More Summary

Book Review: Zone Theory works for Tim And Eric fans, but it’s unlikely to make new converts

Up to this point, the absurdist humor of Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim has been confined to the audiovisual offerings of television, film, and the internet. The duo jumps to the written word with their latest endeavor, Tim And Eric’s...Show More Summary

Book Review: Charles Bukowski’s On Writing is essential for fans but few others

Unlike Stephen King’s 2000 book of the same title, Charles Bukowski’s On Writing is less concerned with the art of its author’s chosen craft than the business of it, the dispiriting processes of pitching and revisions that any professional wordsmith will be oh-so-familiar with. Show More Summary

Book Review: Hunter S. Thompson’s assistant recounts his debauchery and hedonism in Gonzo Girl

There are different types of Hunter S. Thompson fans. There are those who have read (and watched) Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas dozens of times. They’ve donned aviators, a Hawaiian shirt, and a Tilley hat while yelling, “We can’t stop here, this is bat country!” on multiple Halloweens. Show More Summary

The Comparable Max

The essayist and caricaturist Max Beerbohm was one of the great figures of the late Victorian and Edwardian era in London—and then had a surprising Indian summer in America in the early nineteen-sixties, when Edmund Wilson wrote at length in his praise, and the playwright S. Show More Summary

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