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Powerful optical imaging technology catches DNA naturally fluorescing

Biomedical engineers have developed imaging technology that is the first to see DNA 'blink,' or fluoresce. The tool enables researchers to study individual biomolecules (DNA, chromatin, proteins) as well as important global patterns of gene expression, which could yield insights into cancer.

Looking beyond cancer cells to understand what makes breast cancer spread

A new study identifies a protein in that micro-environment that promotes the spread of breast cancer cells. It's part of a well-known family of receptors for which promising inhibitors are being developed.

Site of care may partly explain survival difference between kids and young adults with leukemia

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who were not treated at specialized cancer centers had significantly worse five-year survival compared with children with these...Show More Summary

Role of rogue protein PAK4 confirmed in pancreatic cancer cells

(Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund) A new study that confirms the role of a protein called PAK4 in the movement and growth of pancreatic cancer cells could help researchers find new ways to tackle the disease.

Quality of life with those with advanced cancer improved through walking

(University of Surrey) Walking for just 30 minutes three times per week could improve the quality of life for those with advanced cancer, a new study published in the BMJ Open journal has found.

Tumor suppressor promotes some acute myeloid leukemias, study reveals

(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers in Germany have discovered that a tumor suppressor protein thought to prevent acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can actually promote a particularly deadly form of the disease. The study, 'RUNX1 cooperates with FLT3-ITD to induce leukemia,' which will be published online Feb. Show More Summary

Spider web of cancer proteins reveals new drug possibilities

Scientists have mapped a vast spider web of interactions between proteins in lung cancer cells, as part of an effort to reach what was considered 'undruggable.' This approach revealed new ways to target cells carrying mutations in cancer-causing genes.

Mammograms At The Shopping Mall Raise Interesting Questions About How We Get Our Health Care

Is the future of cancer screening at your local shopping mall? That’s the question sticking in my mind after reading a recent report about a local radiology practice opening a large mammography center in an upscale shopping mall in Long Island, New York. Let’s face it: Medical care is changing. Show More Summary

Spider web of cancer proteins reveals new drug possibilities

(Emory Health Sciences) Scientists at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have mapped a vast spider web of interactions between proteins in lung cancer cells, as part of an effort to reach what was considered 'undruggable.' This approach revealed new ways to target cells carrying mutations in cancer-causing genes.

Scientists reveal the treadmilling motion of dividing bacteria

(Newcastle University) An international team of scientists using the latest imaging techniques have revealed how bacterial division proteins build a partition wall across the cell, one molecule at a time.

Targeting the biological clock could slow the progression of cancer

Does the biological clock in cancer cells influence tumor growth? Yes, according to a new study.

Study associates proximity to oil and gas development and childhood leukemia

Young Coloradans diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia are more likely to live in areas of high-density oil and gas development compared to young Coloradans diagnosed with other types of cancer, according to researchers.

More patients with early-stage breast cancer may be able to avoid chemotherapy in the future

Women with early-stage breast cancer who had an intermediate risk recurrence score (RS) from a 21-gene expression assay had similar outcomes, regardless of whether they received chemotherapy, a new study has found.

Analyzing copies of genes offers new treatment possibilities for ovarian cancer

A team of researchers has developed a new tool to analyze an often overlooked aspect of cancer genetics -- an alteration that results in the loss or gain in a copy of a gene. This change, known as somatic copy-number alterations, may be key to disease progression and might offer new therapeutic approaches for ovarian cancer and other malignancies.

Targeted radiosurgery better than whole-brain radiation for treating brain tumors

(University of Missouri-Columbia) Tumors that originate in other organs of the body and spread to the brain are known as metastatic brain tumors. According to the American Brain Tumor Association, this tumor type is the most common in adults, affecting as many as 300,000 people each year. Show More Summary

ESMO supports the 2017 WHO cancer resolution

(European Society for Medical Oncology) ESMO, the leading European professional organization for medical oncology, presented an official statement supporting the 2017 WHO Cancer Resolution that was discussed at the 140th session of the WHO Executive Board meeting in Geneva, January 23-31.

Site of care may partly explain survival difference between kids and AYAs with leukemia

(American Association for Cancer Research) Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who were not treated at specialized cancer centers had significantly worse five-year...Show More Summary

More patients with early-stage breast cancer may be able to avoid chemotherapy in the future

(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Women with early-stage breast cancer who had an intermediate risk recurrence score (RS) from a 21-gene expression assay had similar outcomes, regardless of whether they received chemotherapy, a new study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer finds.

DNA patterns can unlock how glucose metabolism drives cancer, study finds

Less aggressive cancers are known to have an intact genome--the complete set of genes in a cell--while the genome of more aggressive cancers tends to have a great deal of abnormalities. Now, a new multi-year study of DNA patterns in tumor cells suggests that these aberrant genetic signatures are not random but reflect selective forces in tumor evolution.

Researchers identify new process to raise natural armies of cancer-targeting T lymphocytes

A new culture method has been discovered that unlocks the natural fighter function of immune T cells when they are passing through the bloodstream. This allows T cell armies to be raised directly from blood that naturally recognize and target proteins that are present on most human cancers.

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