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Results of NRG-RTOG 0436 highlight need for biomarkers in treatment of esophageal cancer

(NRG Oncology) NRG-RTOG 0436 has determined that adding an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor to a chemo-radiation regimen does not improve overall survival for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer treated in a non-operative manner. Show More Summary

Potential biomarker discovered to allow more precise classification of malignant brain tumors in children

After leukemia, primary tumors of the brain and spinal cord are the second most common cancers in childhood and adolescence. The presence of the enzyme telomerase characterizes a particularly malignant subgroup of cerebellar ependymomas...Show More Summary

New discovery could reverse tissue damage caused by heart attacks

A new discovery helps to explain how cells which surround blood vessels, called pericytes, stimulate new blood vessels to grow with the hormone 'leptin' playing a key role. Leptin is produced by fat cells which helps to regulate energy balance in the body by inhibiting the appetite. Show More Summary

New discovery could reverse tissue damage caused by heart attacks

(University of Bristol) A new discovery by University of Bristol scientists helps to explain how cells which surround blood vessels, called pericytes, stimulate new blood vessels to grow with the hormone 'leptin' playing a key role. Leptin is produced by fat cells which helps to regulate energy balance in the body by inhibiting the appetite. Show More Summary

New method to generate human antibodies

Scientists have developed a method to rapidly produce specific human antibodies in the laboratory. The technique could speed the production of antibodies to treat a wide range of diseases and facilitate the development of new vaccin...

Scientists enlist baker's yeast in a hunt for new medicines

Scientists have come up with a new way to predict potentially useful drugs from a pool of undefined chemicals. They were able to more quickly identify leads that could be used to treat a range of diseases, from infections, to cancer to Alzheimer's. The finding will also help better match drugs to a disease to maximize the benefit and reduce side-effects.

Weight in adolescence may affect colorectal cancer risk

A new study has uncovered a link between being overweight or obese in adolescence and an increased risk of developing colon cancer in adulthood. Obesity was also associated with an elevated risk of developing rectal cancer.

Molecular hitchhiker on human protein signals tumors to self-destruct

(Vanderbilt University) Vanderbilt University engineers find existing human protein is ideal carrier for powerful molecules that can signal tumors to self-destruct.

COX-2 inhibitors may reverse IDO1-mediated immunosuppression in some cancers

In preclinical studies, tumors that consitutively expressed the protein indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) responded to the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor celecoxib (Celebrex) and had improved infiltration of certain subsets of T cells, making them more likely to respond to anti-PD1 therapies, report researcher.

How blood vessels slow down and accelerate tumor growth

Scientists have discovered a new mechanism that causes faster sprouting of blood vessels. Cells of a specific type called pericytes, which are attached to the outside of fine blood vessels, are involved in this process. If a particular...Show More Summary

Novel CRISPR-Cas9 screening enables discovery of new targets to aid cancer immunotherapy

A novel screening method using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology to test the function of thousands of tumor genes in mice has revealed new drug targets that could potentially enhance the effectiveness of PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors, a promising new class of cancer immunotherapy. Show More Summary

Offer of $100 boosts rates of colon cancer screenings

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Offering $100 to patients eligible for a preventive colonoscopy screening more than doubled the rate of screening when compared to a simple emailed request, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

New study provides BRCA mutation carriers guidance for when surgery has greatest impact

Of the women who carry the mutated BRCA1/2 genes, 45-65 percent will develop breast cancer, and 15-39 percent will develop ovarian cancer. Many women elect to undergo preventive surgeries that can significantly increase life expectancy, but can impact later fertility. Show More Summary

Shooting the Achilles heel of nervous system cancers

Scientists have devised a strategy to target cancer cells while sparing normal cells by capitalizing on vulnerabilities that are exposed only in tumor cells. These vulnerabilities are known as the 'Achilles heel' of cancer cells. Although much is known about the mutations that cause a cell to become malignant, little is known about these vulnerabilities.

Genetic predisposition to breast cancer due to non-BRCA mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish women

Genetic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jewish women. A new article pexamines the likelihood of carrying another cancer-predisposing mutation in BRCA1, BRCA2 or another breast cancer gene among women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry with breast cancer who do not carry one of the founder mutations.

New discovery could lead to better results for patients undergoing radiation

A new study shows why some cells treated with radiation therapy for cancer leak chemical signals and damage unexposed healthy cells, findings that could lead to new medications that patients could take prior to radiation.

Genetic predisposition to breast cancer due to non-brca mutations in ashkenazi Jewish women

(The JAMA Network Journals) Genetic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jewish women. A new article published by JAMA Oncology examines the likelihood of carrying another cancer-predisposing...Show More Summary

Young adult cancer survivors struggle to get back to normal

(University of Michigan) Cancer survivors often talk about wanting to get back to normal, but a new study indicates many young adults who survived the disease struggle with attaining this goal two years after their initial diagnosis...

Combining CAR T cells with existing immunotherapies may overcome resistance in glioblastomas

Genetically modified “hunter” T cells successfully migrated to and penetrated a deadly type of brain tumor known as glioblastoma (GBM) in a clinical trial of the new therapy, but the cells triggered an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and faced a complex mutational landscape that will need to be overcome to better treat this aggressive cancer, researchers report.

New way found to boost immunity in fight cancer and infections

A key new mechanism has been identified that regulates the ability of T-cells of the immune system to react against foreign antigens and cancer.

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