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Penn Vet study uncovers therapeutic targets for aggressive triple-negative breast cancers

(University of Pennsylvania) New findings from a study led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have made inroads into a strategy to identify triple-negative breast cancers at risk for metastasis, and eventually target these cancers with drugs.

Substantial impact of chronic diseases on cancer risk

Several common chronic diseases together account for more than a fifth of new cancer cases and more than a third of cancer deaths.

Relatively unknown gene linked to early emergence of blood diseases

Researchers have discovered the contribution of a specific gene in the proper development of blood cells that give rise to hematopoietic stem cells. The findings identify a potential target for the development of treatments for some types of leukemia, anemia and other blood disorders.

New approach to stimulate an immune response against tumor cells

A team of researchers is trying to find new ways to further enhance the activity of the immune system against cancer. In a new study, the researchers describe how a new type of immunotherapy drug targeting the protein TIM-3 works to stimulate the immune system.

A bacterial duo linked to colon cancer

(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Scientists have identified a combination of bacteria that appears to increase the risk of colon cancer. Through a series of experiments in mice, they were able to pinpoint ways in which the two species of bacteria promote inflammation and break down the mucus layer of the colon.

Changes in genes involved in DNA repair and packaging linked to risk of multiple myeloma

(PLOS) Researchers have identified two gene regions that contribute to multiple myeloma, an inherited cancer that occurs in bone marrow, through a new method that makes use of human disease pedigrees. Nicola Camp and Rosalie Waller of the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, and colleagues, report their findings Feb. 1, 2018, in PLOS Genetics.

A biological approach to precision medicine targets endless number of diseases

A new study proposes a novel approach to manipulate genes using a self-assembling platform that delivers nucleic acids to distinct subsets of cells. The new modular platform offers a robust biological approach -- and may hold the key to the future of personalized medicine.

Researchers discover a potential new therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer

In most pancreatic cancer patients, the diagnosis is made when the disease is already advanced, and there is no effective treatment at present. There have been no significant advances to combat it in recent decades and unfortunately, its occurrence is on the increase. Now, a group of researchers may have found a new form of attack.

Advanced dosimetry phantoms improving radiotherapy verification

(Tomsk Polytechnic University) Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University have developed a material for 3D-printing of dosimetry phantoms, which take into, account the various density of tissues, implants, and pacemakers in the patient's body.

New magnet-based drug delivery system shows promise for cancer treatment

A team of researchers has developed a non-invasive method of delivering drugs directly to cancerous tissue using magnetic forces, a form of treatment that could significantly reduce the toxic side effects of chemotherapy.

New focus on where heart disease and breast cancer treatment meet

(MediaSource) The American Heart Association has released the first scientific statement about heart disease and breast cancer, calling for more research and collaboration between the fields of oncology and cardiology to treat and prevent both diseases.

Cancer 'vaccine' eliminates tumors in mice

Injecting minute amounts of two immune-stimulating agents directly into solid tumors in mice can eliminate all traces of cancer in the animals, including distant, untreated metastases, according to a new study.

Landmark international study: CAR T-cell therapy safe and effective in youth with leukemia

(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Results of the global, multicenter, pivotal phase 2 study that led to the first FDA approval of a gene therapy/cell therapy approach known as CAR T-cell therapy, were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Show More Summary

T cell therapy shows persistent benefits in young leukemia patients

(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Updated results from a global clinical trial of the CAR T-cell therapy, tisagenlecleucel, a landmark personalized treatment for a high-risk form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), reveal that children and young adults continued to show high rates of durable, complete remission of their disease. Show More Summary

Small molecule plays a big role in reducing cancer's spread

One small molecule that helps regulate gene expression plays a big role in keeping us safe from the machinations of cancer, scientists report. In human lung cancer cells, they have shown low levels of the microRNA, miR-125a-5p, which...Show More Summary

HPV may lurk in your throat

Researchers found human papilloma virus (HPV), the culprit behind cervical and head and neck cancers, hiding in small pockets on the surface of tonsils. They believe HPV may evade the immune system in this hiding place, allowing the virus to lay in wait for an opportunity to reinstate an infection or invade the tonsil tissue to develop cancer.

Cancer 'vaccine' eliminates tumors in mice, Stanford researchers find

(Stanford University Medical Center) Injecting minute amounts of two immune-stimulating agents directly into solid tumors in mice can eliminate all traces of cancer in the animals, including distant, untreated metastases, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

HPV may lurk in your throat

(University of Rochester Medical Center) URMC researchers found human papilloma virus (HPV), the culprit behind cervical and head and neck cancers, hiding in small pockets on the surface of tonsils. They believe HPV may evade the immune...Show More Summary

Stealth virus for cancer therapy

Scientists have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. To achieve this they developed a new protein shield that hides the virus and protects it from being eliminated. Adapters on the surface of the virus enable the reconstructed virus to specifically infect tumor cells.

Prostate cancer: Poor prognosis in men with diabetes

(Deutsches Zentrum fuer Diabetesforschung DZD) Men with type 2 diabetes are less likely to develop prostate cancer than patients without diabetes. However, the mortality rate is higher. Researchers were able to show that in the affected individuals the androgen receptor and the mitogenic forms of the insulin receptor were more strongly expressed. Show More Summary

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