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Penn experts call for expansion of molecular imaging in precision cancer care

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) New molecular imaging technologies can make it easier to diagnose, monitor, and treat cancers while potentially saving patients from undergoing therapies that are likely to be ineffective and playing a role in minimizing side effects.

Genetic complexity of cancer cells within the same tumor

A new study dramatically illustrates the complexity of cancer by identifying more than 2,000 genetic mutations in tissue samples of esophageal tumors. The findings reveal that even different areas of individual tumors have various genetic patterns.

New treatment for glioblastoma multiforme

Medical researchers have developed a new pharmacological agent to treat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the deadliest brain cancer.

Magnetic stem cells for gene engineering

(Tomsk Polytechnic University) Russian and British scientists develop a technology to targeted deliver drugs to inflammation spot by magnet controlled stem cells. Native body cells joined magnetic microcapsules are very promising for cell therapy and gene engineering applications.

Endometrial cancer driver mutations detectable in uterine lavage fluid

(PLOS) Mutations that have been linked to endometrial cancer can be found in the uterine lavage fluid of pre- and post-menopausal women both with and without detectable cancer, according to a study published in PLOS Medicine by John Martignetti from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA, and colleagues.

Treating cancer with drugs for diabetes and hypertension

(University of Basel) A combination of a diabetes medication and an antihypertensive drug can effectively combat cancer cells. The team of researchers led by Prof. Michael Hall at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has also reported that specific cancer cells respond to this combination of drugs. The results of the study have now been published in Science Advances.

Naturally occurring mechanism of cancer drug-resistance may itself be a treatment target

(Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research) The use of proteasome inhibitors to treat cancer has been greatly limited by the ability of cancer cells to develop resistance to these drugs. But Whitehead Institute researchers have found...Show More Summary

Treating cancer with drugs for diabetes and hypertension

A combination of a diabetes medication and an antihypertensive drug can effectively combat cancer cells. The team of researchers has also reported that specific cancer cells respond to this combination of drugs.

Fat fuels the road to cancer cell spread

(VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)) Cancer cells spread to other sites in the body through promoting the growth of new 'roads' to travel on. In a study to be published on Dec. 26 in Nature, an international and multidisciplinary team of researchers, led by Prof. Show More Summary

Heterogeneity of tissue resident memory T cells identified as targets of checkpoint therapies

Researchers have identified the critical target of new immune-checkpoint therapies: subsets of immune cells called tissue resident memory (TRM) T cells. In the same research, scientists also found that individual metastatic cancer lesions contain unique sets of TRM cells.

NIAID research aids discovery of genetic immune disorder

(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) NIAID investigators and international colleagues have identified a genetic immune disorder characterized by increased susceptibility and poor immune control of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and, in some cases, an EBV-associated cancer called Hodgkin's lymphoma. Show More Summary

Anti-AXL biologic increases tumor sensitivity to radiation and check-point inhibitors

(Kureczka/Martin Associates) Aravive-S6 selectively inhibits the AXL-signaling pathway that acts as a 'survival switch' that promotes tumor growth and metastasis, and resistance to common chemotherapeutic agents. New research adds to...Show More Summary

Protein that activates immune response harms body's ability to fight HIV

Temporarily blocking a type of protein, called type I interferon, can restore immune function and speed up viral suppression during treatment with anti-viral drugs for people with chronic infection of the virus that causes AIDS, findings from a study in animals appear to demonstrate.

Research aids discovery of genetic immune disorder

Investigators have identified a genetic immune disorder characterized by increased susceptibility and poor immune control of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and, in some cases, an EBV-associated cancer called Hodgkin's lymphoma. The researchers...Show More Summary

New precision medicine tool helps optimize cancer treatment

A user-friendly computational tool has been created that rapidly predicts which genes are implicated in an individual’s cancer and recommends treatments.

Researchers use mathematical modeling to explain evolutionary phenomenon that leads to treatment resistance

Reserachers are using mathematical models to explain how bacteria and cancer cells exploit an evolutionary process known as bet-hedging to resist medical intervention.

An 'IRBIT'uary before cell death

Billions of cells in our bodies die every day in an important process called apoptosis. Now, researchers have mapped out a sequence of events that are necessary for apoptosis to occur properly. The study focuses on the protein IRBIT and how its action near mitochondria in our cells can set off a chain reaction that leads to programmed cell death.

The way you move: Tumor cells move differently than normal ones

Tumor cells can't move the same way that normal cells do to get through tight squeezes in the body, opening up the potential for future, targeted therapies, new research suggests.

Results of major myeloma treatment trial published in The Lancet

(SWOG) The addition of bortezomib to a standard two-drug regimen for multiple myeloma patients significantly lengthened the time before their cancer returned, and significantly lengthened their lives, according to clinical trial results in The Lancet.

Study provides roadmap to more personalized cancer treatment

People with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and the KRAS-variant inherited genetic mutation have significantly improved survival when given a short course of the drug cetuximab in combination with standard chemotherapy and radiation, research has found.

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