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Biomarker may predict which formerly treated cancer patients will develop highly fatal form of leukemia

(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Patients successfully treated for breast, colon and other cancers can go on to develop an often-fatal form of leukemia, sometimes years after completion of treatment, due to a genetic mutation leading to secondary malignancies known as therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs).

Maintaining immune cells in head and neck cancer

Inhibiting prostaglandin production slows the progression of premalignant lesions to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), researchers report. Preclinical studies showed that treatment of premalignant lesions with indomethacin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) similar to aspirin, increased the presence of immune cells and lessened tumor burden.

A receptor discovered for progranulin

Researchers have discovered a cell-surface receptor highly expressed by cancerous and brain cells that directly and tightly binds progranulin. Importantly, the researchers also showed that this binding activates a cellular program that makes cancer cells more aggressive.

New minimally invasive device to treat cancer and other illnesses

A new device that could revolutionize the delivery of medicine to treat cancer as well as a host of other diseases and ailments has been outlined in a new report.

Advanced soft tissue sarcomas respond to a combination of a new and an existing anti-cancer drug

Researchers working to find effective treatments for soft tissue sarcomas have discovered that combining a new anti-cancer drug with an existing one kills cancer cells not only in the laboratory but also in the first two patients treated with it, leading to unusually long-lasting periods without the disease progressing.

Phase I trial shows that a drug that inhibits the Notch signalling process is active in a range of advanced cancers

A new anti-cancer drug that inhibits a key cell signalling process involved in many different cancers has shown that it is capable of stopping the progression of cancer and shrinking tumors. Importantly, it has been able to do this in rare cancers that are less well-studied such as adenoid cystic carcinoma.

Study: Enhancing cancer response to radiation

(Oregon Health & Science University) Study provides early evidence that a panel of microRNA may be used in the future as a biomarker for several types of cancer.

A drug that inhibits the Notch signalling process is active in a range of advanced cancers

(ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation) A new anti-cancer drug that inhibits a key cell signalling process involved in many different cancers has shown that it is capable of stopping the progression of cancer and shrinking tumors; importantly, in rare, less well-studied cancers such as adenoid cystic carcinoma. Show More Summary

Advanced soft tissue sarcomas respond to new drug GDC-0575 combined with gemcitabine

(ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation) Researchers working to find effective treatments for soft tissue sarcomas have discovered that combining a new anti-cancer drug with an existing one kills cancer cells not only in the laboratory...Show More Summary

UTSA study describes new minimally invasive device to treat cancer and other illnesses

(University of Texas at San Antonio) A new study by Lyle Hood, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), describes a new device that could revolutionize the delivery of medicine to treat cancer as well as a host of other diseases and ailments. Show More Summary

New role for Hippo pathway in suppressing cancer immunity

Previous studies identified the Hippo pathway kinases LATS1/2 as a tumor suppressor, but new research reveals a surprising role for these enzymes in subduing cancer immunity. The findings could have a clinical role in improving efficiency of immunotherapy drugs.

With promising results from emerging therapies, research yields hope for amyloidosis

Two new treatments are showing promise and overall survival is on the rise for AL amyloidosis, according to a series of studies. Immunoglobulin light-chain amyloidosis (AL) is a rare, life-threatening disease that occurs when toxic proteins build up in organs, which alters their normal function.

Protective barrier inside chromosomes helps to keep cells healthy

Fresh insights into the structures that contain our genetic material could explain how the body's cells stay healthy. A protective barrier formed inside each of our chromosomes helps to prevent errors occurring when cells divide, researchers say. The study sheds light on the precise interplay between key factors inside chromosomes that leads to the formation of the barrier.

Alcohol intake associated with increased risk of melanoma

Alcohol intake was associated with higher rates of invasive melanoma among white men and women, according to a study. White wine carried the most significant association, and the increased risk was greater for parts of the body that receive less sun exposure, the study showed.

The latest advances in the study of blood diseases presented at annual meeting of ASH

(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) The 2016 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting highlights research from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists and clinicians.

Study examines association of asbestos exposure, mesothelioma in Eastern China

(The JAMA Network Journals) A new research letter published online by JAMA Oncology looks at asbestos exposure and malignant mesothelioma in Eastern China.

Metabolite that promotes cancer cell transformation and colorectal cancer spread identified

The metabolite D-2-hydroxyglurate (D-2HG) promotes epithelial–mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells, leading them to develop features of lower adherence to neighboring cells, increased invasiveness, and greater likelihood of metastatic spread. This finding highlights the value of targeting D-2HG to establish new therapeutic approaches against colorectal cancer.

UA receives $1.5 million to study cancer in firefighters

(University of Arizona Health Sciences) Researchers at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health will lead a collaborative research project to develop the framework for a long-term study of cancer in firefighters.

Promising results from new drug combination in patients with advanced solid tumors

(ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation) An experimental drug called TAS-114, which has the potential to increase the anti-cancer effects of chemotherapy without increasing adverse side effects, has shown promising results in patients with hard-to-treat cancers in a phase I clinical trial. Show More Summary

Results from 3 ground-breaking studies show early benefit to patients

(ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation) The 'revolution in the understanding of cancer at the molecular level' has led to dramatic responses in cancer patients to new therapies that are targeted precisely at their particular type of tumors, according to an expert. Show More Summary

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