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I’m 100% certain that this is why my body is messed up

A survey of 300 garment workers in Los Angeles provides insight on the unsafe and unhealthy conditions they experience while they meet consumer demand for trendy fast-casual clothes.

Occupational Health News Roundup

The New York Times interviews current, former workers at restaurants run by Trump's labor secretary nominee; Kentucky lawmakers move to weaken unions; Maryland county votes to raise the minimum wage to $15; and Houston's new police chief calls for better mental health services for police officers.

“Refinery Town” points the way forward to protect communities and defend rights

A just published book – Refinery Town: Big Oil, Big Money and the Remaking of an America City – describes how a decade of local organizing and year-round campaigning has resulted in impressive local victories in a Black, white and Asian...Show More Summary

More voices against ACA repeal: Republican governors and The 27 Percent

As Congressional Republicans continue taking steps toward repealing the Affordable Care Act without providing a detailed, workable plan to replace it, more people are speaking out against ACA repeal.

A union’s persistence results in new OSHA rule for workers exposed to beryllium

For four decades the United Steelworkers had their sight focused on an OSHA rule to protect workers who are exposed to beryllium. The metal can cause a horrible respiratory illness and is a carcinogen. Last week, the union's persistence paid off.

Trump in talks with anti-vaxxer to chair commission on vaccine safety. Seriously.

Because taking health insurance away from millions of Americans isn’t bad enough, President-elect Trump has reportedly asked an outspoken critic of vaccines — a man who supported the thoroughly debunked notion that vaccines are linked to autism — to lead a commission on vaccine safety.

The growing opposition to ACA “repeal and delay”

As the costs -- in terms of insurance, jobs, and tax revenue -- of the Republican "repeal and delay" plan for the ACA become clearer, public support for that option is at just 20%.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Workers suffering the 'lethal legacy' of a General Electric plant in Canada fight for compensation; OSHA looks into an Arizona commission that routinely reduces penalties for safety violations; advocates ponder the future of OSHA's Severe Violator Enforcement Program; and millions of workers get a raise in the new year.

Libby asbestos disaster far from over, millions have no clue of the danger (rerun)

While The Pump Handle is on holiday break, we are republishing some of our favorite posts from the past year. This one is from April 2016: Reporter Andrew Schneider has written a sequel to his 2004 book "An Air That Kills: How the Asbestos...Show More Summary

Study: Higher gun ownership rates up the risk of a woman being murdered (rerun)

While The Pump Handle is on holiday break, we are republishing some of our favorite posts from the past year. This one is from January 2016: : In the midst of another national debate over gun safety regulations, some argue that higher rates of gun ownership will protect people from dangerous strangers with deadly intentions. Show More Summary

In the fight for a rest break, Dallas construction workers find their voice: ‘This is not the end, but a stepping stone to something bigger’ (rerun)

While The Pump Handle is on holiday break, we are republishing some of our favorite posts from the past year. This one is from May 2016: Last summer, 25-year-old Roendy Granillo died of heat stroke while he installed flooring in a house in Melissa, Texas, just north of Dallas. Show More Summary

Making the case for safer paint strippers (rerun)

While The Pump Handle is on holiday break, we are republishing some of our favorite posts from the past year. This one is from March 2016: A painter named Jason, who nearly died from using a methylene chloride-based paint stripper, teams up with the California Department of Public Health to make the case for using safer alternatives.

Two decades after welfare reform, more deep poverty and fewer college degrees (rerun)

While The Pump Handle is on holiday break, we are republishing some of our favorite posts from the past year. This one is from August 2016: Two decades ago, President Bill Clinton signed the “Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity...Show More Summary

Drop in preterm births followed Colorado’s rise in long-acting contraception use (rerun)

While The Pump Handle is on holiday break, we are republishing some of our favorite posts from the past year. This one is from February 2016: A study finds the odds of preterm birth were lower among Colorado women living in counties served by Title X clinics, which began offering free access to IUDs and contraceptive implants in 2009.

Disease outbreak guarantees: A proposal to build public health capacity in developing nations (rerun)

While The Pump Handle is on holiday break, we are republishing some of our favorite posts from the past year. This one is from July 2016: In 2005, the World Health Assembly adopted a revised version of its International Health Regulations,...Show More Summary

Public health ROI: Fluoridation prevents tooth decay and saves a ton of money

As 2016 comes to a close — and 2017 looms with enormous uncertainty — let’s end the year with some encouraging public health news. This time it’s a study on one of the 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century: fluoridation.

Deadly legacy of coal mining: a thousand new black lung disease cases

An NPR investigation identified nearly 1,000 new cases in Appalachia of the most severe form of black lung disease. The government's surveillance system recorded just a fraction of them.

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