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Just how long does the Ebola virus linger in semen?

46 minutes agoHealth / Epidemiology : Aetiology

The 2013-2016 West African Ebola virus outbreak altered our perception of just what an Ebola outbreak could look like. While none of the three primary affected countries–Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea-have had a case since April 2016, the outbreak resulted in a total of over 28,000 cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD)–65 times higher than…

Occupational Health News Roundup

New Jersey's growing temp industry is rife with labor violations, worker mistreatment; advocates in North Carolina demand safer conditions for poultry plant workers; former Wells Fargo workers sue over aggressive sales quotas that led to fraud; and an investigation into northern California's marijuana industry finds rampant sexual abuse and assault.

Worth reading: Antibiotic resistance, invisible workforce, and detectives dismissing rape allegations

Recent pieces adress how the UN plans to address antibiotic resistance; New Jersey's temp worker industry; Baltimore detectives' dismissals of rape allegations with insufficient investigation; and more.

Report: New York City’s paid sick leave law had virtually no negative impact

Despite all the concern about shuttered businesses, fired employees and lost profits, a new report has found that New York City’s paid sick leave law was pretty much a “non-event” for most employers.

My hot mail carrier, his boss’ air conditioned sedan

The temperature yesterday in Austin, TX was 97 and the heat index was 104. My USPS mail carrier was feeling the heat in more ways than one.

Global supply chains still full of sweatshops

In the early 1990s, sports apparel giant Nike became the “poster child” for sweatshops in its global supply chain – child labor, forced labor (mandatory overtime), wage theft, confiscation of migrant workers’ passports, sexual harassment of women workers, and unsafe and unhealthy working conditions. Jump ahead 25 years, vast global supply chains with multiple tiers…

Polio cases in Nigeria are bad news for eradication effort

Last summer, Nigeria celebrated having gone a year without a case of polio. But then last month, two children in Nigeria were diagnosed with polio paralysis, in Borno state (in northeastern Nigeria) in areas liberated from Boko Haram militants.

Study: Fracking chemicals linked to reproductive health abnormalities in mice

In a new study — the first of its kind — researchers fed water laced with fracking chemicals to pregnant mice and then examined their female offspring for signs of impaired fertility. They found negative effects at both high and low chemical concentrations, which raises red flags for human health as well.

Not an “accident”: Emilio Dodd, 55, suffers fatal work-related injury in Lewisville, TX

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Tuesday, September 6, in Lewisville, TX

Dangerous chemicals, dangerous technology – Industry’s persistent push to protect asbestos

Users of asbestos in the chlor-alkali industry do not want EPA to list asbestos as one of its priority chemicals. They claim it can be used safely. The industry's record of controlling hazards does not support their assertion.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Oklahoma Supreme Court rules against state's opt-out workers' compensation law; asbestos removal companies accused of discriminatory hiring; new research finds New York City's paid sick leave law barely impacted businesses and hiring; and researchers predict that raising Colorado's minimum wage will pump millions into the local economy.

US uninsurance rate continues to decline, but state actions threaten gains

New estimates from CDC's National Center for Health Statistics show the uninsurance rate has continued to decline -- but actions in some states threaten Medicaid expansion gains.

Labor Day report: ‘The worker justice movement is on a winning streak’

Earlier this week, we published our annual report, “The Year In U.S. Occupational Health & Safety: Fall 2015 – Summer 2016,” chronicling the victories, setbacks and struggles taking place in the American workplace. But it was just about...Show More Summary

Defending their toxics – Industry pushes to protect its preferred chemicals under the new TSCA

As the EPA begins implementing the Frank Lautenberg Chemical Safety Act, the chemical industry is already busy pushing the agency to limit scrutiny of various widely used but highly toxic chemicals.

Fatal work injury that killed Harold Felton, 36, was preventable, Washington-OSHA cites Alki Construction

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Harold Felton, 36, could have been prevented had Alki Construction followed worker safety regulations.

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