All Blogs / Health / Epidemiology / New


EPA embraces new chemical safety law, proposes rule to ban certain uses of trichloroethylene

EPA announced yesterday a proposed rule to ban trichloroethylene as a spot-cleaning agent in dry cleaning operations and as an aerosol spray degreaser. The agency is again moving swiftly to use its authority under a chemical safety ...

The fate of the Affordable Care Act

Congressional Republicans have voted repeatedly to repeal the ACA, but now that they actually have a shot at doing that, journalists and commentators are focusing on how hard it will be to preserve the provisions voters like and politicians vow to keep – let alone the gains in insurance coverage and financial stability.

Not an “accident”: Bud Wesley, 65, suffers fatal work-related injury in Belding, MI

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Wednesday, November 30 in Belding, MI.

Occupational Health News Roundup

If the ACA is repealed, miners could lose out on critical compensation workplace illness; New York farm owner indicted in death of teen worker; possible contender for U.S. labor secretary opposes minimum wage hike; and in good news, Ikea expands paid parental leave for its U.S. workers.

CDC: Health care workers report highest rates of asthma

More than 2 million U.S. adults may be living with workplace-related asthma, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Free on-line course on “decent work in global supply chains” offered by the Global Labour University

A free, two-month course on global supply chains is being offered on-line by the Global Labour University starting on January 12, 2017. The course is being taught in English by Penn State University Professor Mark Anner, one the leading labor-oriented researchers on the global economy.

EPA beats Congress’ deadline, names first 10 chemicals for action under new law

EPA met its first major milestone under the new chemical safety law passed by Congress this past June. It announced its list for the first 10 chemicals for which it will prepare risk evaluations. Those evaluations could lead to restrictions on use or phase-outs of chemicals that presents an unreasonable risk to humans and the environment.

Even after the Rana Plaza disaster it is hard to get international clothing brands to do the right thing

A new report by four leading workers’ rights group shows just how hard it is to get international clothing brands to fix problems in their global supply chains despite the fact that 1,100 workers were killed in an instant in an unsafe...Show More Summary

Study: U.S. still lags behind on health care affordability and access

The percentage of Americans who reported cost-related barriers to health care dropped from 37 percent in 2013 to 33 percent in 2016 — a change that directly corresponds to insurance expansions under the Affordable Care Act, a new study reports. On the flip side, Americans are still more likely than peers in other high-income nations to face financial obstacles to health care.

Teen birth rates drop nationwide, but more slowly in rural counties

New data from CDC's National Center for Health Statistics show that the US teen birth rate dropped substantially between 2007 and 2015, but it has declined most slowly in rural areas.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Advocates sound off on whether worker safety will survive under Trump; an intimate interview with a waitress highlights inconsistent income and sexual harassment; a court blocks Obama's overtime rule from taking effect; and United Food and Commercial Workers pushes for health and safety training for California's marijuana workers.

An era of racism and xenophobia

Polling data and early appointment decisions suggest we're looking at worsening racism and xenophobia in the US.

Butterball turkey plant: an “injury-free” workplace yet plenty of walking wounded

Writing for Slate, Gabriel Thompson spent time in northwest Arkansas investigating working conditions in a Butterball turkey plant. You would be wise to disregard the poultry industry's claims about record-low injury rates.

Florida’s Stand Your Ground law led to sharp increase in homicides

In 2005, Florida legislators passed the nation’s first “Stand Your Ground” law, expanding legal immunity for residents to use lethal force when they believe they’re being threatened. A decade later, a new study finds that Florida has experienced a significant increase in homicides, while states without such laws have not.

Two reports profile low-wages, grim conditions for workers in the food industry

Oxfam's "Women on the Line" and the Food Chain Workers' Alliance's "No Piece of the Pie" provide more evidence of the low wages, harsh conditions, and disrespect experienced by millions of workers in the U.S. food industry.

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC