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Death Rates from Alzheimer’s Disease Jump by 55 Percent How? Why?

By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomDeath rates from Alzheimer’s disease (AD) increased by 55 percent between 1999 and 2014, according to a study released by the Centers for Disease control and Prevention (CDC).The number of Alzheimer’s deaths at home also increased from 14 percent to 25 percent. Show More Summary

A Grieving Gorilla: A Picture That's Worth Entire Courses

A photo of a sad orphaned gorilla and a comforting human raises numerous questions about what other animals think and feel and the emotions shared in human-animal relationships.

16-Year Study: Surprising Findings about Marriage and Health

In a 16-year study, more than 11,000 people were followed as they married and divorced. Here’s what happened to their health, life satisfaction, and depression.

“I HATE Three-Day Weekends!” (Got an offer for ya’)

If you ask the blogging experts, posting an article on a Friday evening is just plain silly. Well, the heck with conventional wisdom, we have business to handle. Do you hate three-day weekends? Got an offer for ya'...

Chris Cornell’s Life and Death: Suicide Is Not Painless

We don’t know the depth of people’s suffering, the silent struggles they daily endure, their intimate familiarity with despair, and their sudden fervent desire to die.

Century-old drug as potential new approach to autism

In a small, randomized Phase I/II clinical trial (SAT1), researchers say a 100-year-old drug called suramin, originally developed to treat African sleeping sickness, was safely administered to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who subsequently displayed measurable, but transient, improvement in core symptoms of autism.

Brain anatomy differs in people with 22q genetic risk for schizophrenia, autism

Study characterizes, for the first time, brain differences between people with a specific genetic risk for schizophrenia and those at risk for autism, and the findings could help explain the biological underpinnings of these neuropsychiatric disorders.

5 Things to Remember When You're Embarrassed to Ask for Help

Asking for help is tough. But there are some good reasons why you should do it anyway.

Rapid smell source localization: Mechanism discovered

Fundamental insights into the mechanism of smell localization have now been gained by researchers. This marks an important step in unraveling the entire neural odor localization mechanism, which is highly valuable to the study of memory diseases such as Alzheimer's. Show More Summary

Disrupted fat breakdown in the brain makes mice dumb

A new study opens a new perspective with regard to the development of dementia. The scientists blocked the breakdown of a certain fat molecule in the mouse brain. As a result the animals exhibited learning and memory problems. Also the quantity of Alzheimer-specific proteins in their brains increased significantly. The researchers now have a clue as to why the mice become dumb.

Tau prevents synaptic transmission at early stage of neurodegeneration

Tau proteins are involved in more than twenty neurodegenerative diseases, including various forms of dementia. These proteins clump together in patients’ brains to form neuronal tangles: protein aggregation that eventually coincides with the death of brain cells. Show More Summary

Flies the key to studying the causes of dementia

A research team has studied two structurally-similar proteins in the adult brain and have found that they play distinct roles in the development of dementia.

Patient's cells used to replicate dire developmental condition

A team of scientists has used the cells of AHDS patients to recreate not only the disease, but a mimic of the patient's blood-brain barrier in the laboratory dish using induced pluripotent stem cell technology.

What is survival among patients with Parkinson, Dementia with lewy bodies?

A new article compares survival rates among patients with synucleinopathies, including Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson disease dementia and multiple system atrophy with parkinsonism, with individuals in the general population.

Possible reasons for loss of smell

Studies have shown that loss of the sense of smell can be among the first warning signs of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Now a researcher wants to shift the search for clues about this process back even further, to find...Show More Summary

Shortage of progranulin is a frequent cause of frontotemporal dementia

Researchers have revealed a novel function for progranulin in lysosomes: it acts as chaperone of the lysosomal protease cathepsin D.

In Huntington's disease, traffic jams in the cell's control center kill brain cells

Working with mouse, fly and human cells and tissue, researchers report new evidence that disruptions in the movement of cellular materials in and out of a cell's control center -- the nucleus -- appear to be a direct cause of brain cell death in Huntington's disease, an inherited adult neurodegenerative disorder.

Antibiotic doxycycline may offer hope for treatment of Parkinson's disease

Doxycycline, an antibiotic used for over half a century against bacterial infections, can be prescribed at lower doses for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, say researchers.

How listening to music in a group influences depression

New research takes a closer look at how music influences the mood in people suffering from depression, and examines what factors might affect whether listening to sad music in group settings provides social benefits for listeners, or if it rather reinforces depressive tendencies.

Overweight/obese people with diabetes at increased risk of brain abnormalities

Overweight and obese individuals with early stage type 2 diabetes (T2D) had more severe and progressive abnormalities in brain structure and cognition compared to normal-weight study participants, research indicates.

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