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Will there be justice for the people of Libby?

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer broke the story of the asbestos poisoning of Libby, Mont., 10 years ago. But with the final edition of the newspaper rolling off the presses tonight, we won't be here to report on the outcome of the W.R. Grace criminal trial that resulted from the revelations about what happened to Libby and its people.

Popcorn flavoring victims dies as jury awards $7.5 million, but government does little to prevent future diacetyl exposure

Ronald Kuiper died last week, just one day before a jury decided that a maker of chemical butter flavoring owed him $7.5 million for destruction of his lungs.

Almost everyone agrees that asbestos has killed hundreds in Libby, but Grace lawyers still argue over name

Until today, I really thought that Judge Donald Molloy's prediction that the W.R. Grace criminal trial would take four to five months to complete was a bit extreme. I based this on the fact that the testimony of two key government witnesses – On-site Coordinator Paul Peronard and Dr. Show More Summary

Grace lawyer tries to show that government concealed more secrets in Libby than the company on trial

By the end of testimony at the W.R. Grace criminal trial today, I was thinking that some of the jurors and many of the spectators were beginning to believe that the federal government was more guilty of concealing the asbestos dangers in Libby, Mont., than the international chemical company that's on trial.

We do have a choice: VOC in paint

Our white wall to wall bookcases, blackened from over a decade of “dog” rubbing against the corners, kids whose little shoes marred the window seat, and woodstove particles that had settled into the cracks and crevices, were looking dingy. Show More Summary

Top government witness testifies of continuing hazard in Libby; W.R. Grace lawyers object throughout

It took Judge Donald Molloy just 14 words this morning to respond to hours of yammering Monday by Grace lawyers who wanted to prevent a crucial government witness from testifying.

Grace lawyers team up to attempt to stifle another government expert witness.

With the W.R. Grace criminal trial recessed for the day because of a sick juror, defense lawyers jumped at the opportunity to use the free time to pummel a U.S. Public Health Service physician who is one of the government's key witnesses.

Grace criminal trial salled for sick juror, defense lawyers ramp up to stifle testimony of gov't witness

Judge Donald Molloy recessed the trial before it started, saying he's waiting for a medical report on whether an ill juror is too sick to continue and will have to be replaced by one of the three alternates.

Second week of W.R. Grace criminal trial ends with defense arguing epidemiologists know more than physicians

Of course, no one will know until the jury hearing the W.R. Grace criminal trial issues a verdict three, four or five months from now, but the 15 jurors and alternates were given a lot to consider today as the second week of testimony ended. Show More Summary

One witness in Grace trial scores while another bombs out

LIBBY, Mont. - One vital prosecution witness at the W.R. Grace criminal trial ended his testimony to rave reviews and second critical witness stumbled badly Tuesday.

Judge Molloy blames everything wrong on the prosecution in the Grace criminal trial

Even court personnel and defense lawyers seemed a bit stunned Monday when Chief U.S District Judge Donald Molly ripped into government prosecutors blaming them for every problem but global warming.

Grace lawyers bring a stimulus package but find no snakeskin boots

Missoula, Mont., has more than its share of great eateries. The absolute best burger in the world comes off the tiny grill at the scruffy Missoula Club, or a breakfast of brains and eggs and other memorable fare at Oxford Saloon and Café. Show More Summary

First week of WR Grace criminal trial ends with sparks flying and more promised.

The first week of the nation's biggest environmental crime case is over. Jurors headed home to a well-deserved drink or a fistful of headache pills. Some lawyers flew back east while most are, and will be, cloistered way until Monday...Show More Summary

Appeals court overturns Judge's ruling barring witnesses-crime victims in WR Grace trial from watching

The 9th U.S. Court of Appeal has overturned Judge Donald Molloy's order keeping victims of asbestos exposure who will testify in the W.R. Grace criminal trial from observing the proceedings.

WR Grace succeeds in limiting what government's most knowledgeable witness can testify about.

It took just minutes for W.R. Grace's top lawyer to begin denouncing the scientific qualifications of the government's chief witness and the man who led the government's efforts to protect the people of Libby from the asbestos that poisoned their small Montana town.

Jury at Libby trial hears the first group of asbestos victims from Libby and defense lawyer objects to almost every question

If W.R. Grace lawyer Barbara Harding got a buck each time she leaped out of her chair to object to a question the prosecution had asked their witness, she probably would have made more today than the $40 each juror got paid to serve at the largest environmental crime trial in history.

Observers say Montana federal judge continues to issue orders stifling government's case aganst Grace

Judge's order stifles government's case in the trial of the poisoning of Libby, Montana. W.R. Grace gets yet another break from presiding judge.

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