Discover a new way to find and share stories you'll love… Learn about Reading Desk

All Blogs / Industries / Media / Media Industry News / Popular


Stop trolling your readers

The newest trend in headlines is flat-out trolling readers. For awhile, the "curiosity gap" was the headline style of choice, meant to entice readers into clicking by omitting a key piece of information. But fewer people are falling for those Upworthy-style headlines. Show More Summary

Opening up the archives: JSTOR wants to tie a library to the news

The Journal of Parasitology published its first issue in September 1914. The academic journal — which, you’ll be surprised to learn, publishes scholarly writing about the study of parasites — is celebrating its 100th anniversary this fall. You can even buy a t-shirt to mark the occasion! But unless you’re a parasitologist, it’s unlikely you’ve...

A different take on Syria

In weekly dispatches, readers of The Syria Report have been tracking the implosion of the war-torn country by the numbers: The country will begin importing beef from The Netherlands; olive oil production is expected to drop by half this year; wheat supplied by Syrian farmers is at historical lows. It's one of the few steady voices on macroeconomic and business...

Sonic storytelling

In August, when documentary filmmakers Pacho Velez and Dan Claridge began shooting a film about a drag-racing track in upstate in New York, they were divided about what story they wanted to tell. While Claridge kept his camera on his uncles, twins who run a dry cleaner by day, and drag-race cars by night, Velez placed microphones around the edge...

Six fresh ideas for news design from a #SNDMakes designathon

The Society for News Design hosted its second #SNDMakes hackathon in Boston this past weekend. The last iteration of the event was held in Indianapolis, hosted about two dozen designers, developers, and journalists, and produced a handful of ongoing projects. This fall’s event was hosted by Upstatement, the Boston-based design firm that’s worked with a...

How xenophobia is driving the Ebola narrative

A recent Newsweek cover story showed a photograph of a gorilla accompanied by an inaccurate headline that contaminated bushmeat could bring Ebola to the US. Four weeks later on Fox News, Keith Albow, a member of the network's Medical A-team, accused President Obama of failing to protect us because "His affiliations are with Africa...not us. He's their leader." And these...

Washington Post's partnership with local papers draws encouraging early results

Back in April, we asked whether a new partnership program between The Washington Post and regional papers around the country—in which print subscribers to participating local papers get free digital access to the Post’s website and apps—might...Show More Summary

Where you get your news depends on where you stand on the issues

Strong liberals and strong conservatives disagree on an awful lot — but there are a lot of ways they’re more like each other than they are like those closer to the middle. And some of those involve the ways they interact with news media. That’s one of the takeaways from a new report from the...

The California Sunday Magazine sets out to win the West

After many months of eager anticipation in media circles, The California Sunday Magazine launched Oct. 5 with a print run of more than 400,000 copies. Just don’t call it a “print launch” to Douglas McGray, the co-founder and editor in chief. “None of us see this as a print launch,” he said, a little over a week after the first issue...

Yahoo Tests New Homepage: Users Say ’Epic Fail’

The new Yahoo homepage is making an unexpected test appearance on thousands of users’ computers, and the response has been overwhelmingly negative. According to Tech Crunch, Yahoo has been working through a major design overhaul for the past year or so, and has now started testing the new format. Show More Summary

Light everywhere: The California Civic Data Coalition wants to make public datasets easier to crunch

When Meg Whitman ran for governor of California in 2010, she donated $144 million of her own money to her campaign. Whitman, the Republican nominee, ultimately lost to Democrat Jerry Brown, but her spending ensured that the race was the most expensive non-presidential campaign in American history. It was obvious Whitman was spending a fortune...

Why media probably shouldn't name Ebola victims

By the time the video of Nina Pham was released last week, most Americans were likely familiar with her name--and the fact that she is one of two nurses diagnosed with Ebola after treating victim Thomas Eric Duncan. In the video, uploaded by Dallas Presbyterian Hospital, where Pham was working when she contracted the disease, the nurse smiles through tears...

CNN The Most Trusted Name In News? New Poll Says Otherwise

A new poll found that CNN does have the highest percentage of trust among respondents, but a large conservative audience actively distrusts the cable news network. The Rush Limbaugh Show is the most distrusted news source in Pew’s survey,...Show More Summary

Ebola Deeply builds on the lessons of single-subject news sites: A news operation with an expiration date

A contagious disease outbreak seems like a good time for some explanatory journalism. News outlets are scrambling to cover the latest developments in the Ebola outbreak with reporting that can provide background on the spread — and any potential risks — of the disease. It’s a balancing act, made more difficult by the worry and...

How common descriptors fall out of favor

Once upon a time, as far back as 40 years or so, language pedants would not use "hopefully" to mean anything other than "in a hopeful manner." Many others, though, used it to mean "it is hoped," and wouldn't stop, to much derision from the traditionalists. "Hopefully" had become what Bryan A. Garner calls a "skunked term." As explained in...

Ben Bradlee, Editor Who Exposed Watergate Scandal, Dies at 93

The editor who directed the exposure of the Watergate scandal, which led to the demise of Richard Nixon as President of the United States, has died. Ben Bradlee, who is the former executive editor of The Washington Post, held that position...Show More Summary

This study finds that social media use reduces political polarization instead of increasing it

One of the most common complaints about social media is about filter bubbles — the idea that, because you choose your own universe of friends or accounts on platforms like Twitter and Facebook, you risk cocooning yourself in a world of likeminded perspectives. Conservatives only hear from fellow conservatives, the argument goes, liberals from fellow...

We Need to Talk is part of the solution

To say that We Need To Talk, CBS Sports Network's new show with a cast of all women, picked a perfect launch date might understate the timing. The show made its debut on September 30, right as the sports world around it had exploded thanks to the NFL's fumbled handling of the domestic violence case involving Baltimore Ravens running back...

Donald Trump Questions Obama’s Sanity, Calls President ‘Psycho’

Donald Trump has always been vocal in his criticism of President Obama, from perpetuating the “Birther” theories to his latest tweet, where he slammed the President for what Trump views as a major oversight in the handling of the current Ebola crisis. Show More Summary

Who dat? In New Orleans, The Times-Picayune is making print a little more regular

It’s probably not a happy morning in New Orleans. Despite leading 23-10 with less than four minutes left, a defensive breakdown and an incredibly poorly timed interception left the hometown Saints (my boss’ favorite team) with a stunning loss to the Detroit Lions (my favorite team). But New Orleanians can at least commiserate with what...

Copyright © 2011 Regator, LLC