Discover a new way to find and share stories you'll love… Learn about Reading Desk

All Blogs / Industries / Media / Media Industry News / Popular


The fall and rise of the news bundle

The bundle is dead; long live the bundle. But this isn’t the familiar 20th-century package of paper and ink. It’s a bundle that lives as code, often assembled by other bits of code, and almost invariably run by people who write code, not words. The bundle used to be that daily paper delivered to the...

The year of yes

I conducted a programming study 10 years ago that showed the gatekeepers of public radio were, on average, 45-year-old white males. This generation of architects — whose passion and commitment have given us a strong institution that is now in the midst of change — is beginning a 5- to 7-year peel-off — another aspect...

What might vs. what should

Here are three things that aren’t necessarily going to happen in 2015, but should happen so journalism can have a great new year. This isn’t a set of predictions; it’s a wish list. We’ll stop using the word “technology” to marginalize things that don’t fit our definition of journalism. Journalists use the word “technology” to...

All signs point to Mike Wilson being named the next Dallas Morning News editor

FiveThirtyEight managing editor Mike Wilson was at the Dallas Morning News a week ago to interview for the editor job. My source says he was the only candidate to visit the newsroom. (Bob Mong, who has been with the News for 35 year, is retiring sometime next year.) Earlier today the News staff was told … Read More

Why podcasts make sense

Two-thousand fourteen was a very good year for the podcast. It saw the creation of five podcast networks; an estimated 15 percent of Americans listened to podcasts each month (up from 9 percent in 2008); and Serial, the most popular podcast ever, debuted in October and drew over a million listeners per episode; that same month, Ira Glass went...

High school paper: Our state schools boss plagiarized, so we’re doing it too

Sherri Ybarro, who becomes Idaho’s State Superintendent of Public Instruction next month, was caught plagiarizing from her opponent’s website during the campaign. (She says she was surprised to see the similar language, but “I take responsibility...Show More Summary

What the Sony hacks reveal about the news industry

Along with employee salaries, Channing Tatum’s penchant for all-caps, and executives’ racially charged jokes about President Obama, the Sony email hacks reveal the media ecosystem in illuminating detail. The communications, stolen by...Show More Summary

New friends: The Washington Post and The Texas Tribune enter into a new reporting partnership

The Texas Tribune is taking its split with The New York Times pretty well. Two months ago the Times ended its story-sharing agreement with the Austin-based news nonprofit after four years. Now, the Tribune has a new dance partner: The Washington Post. The Post and The Texas Tribune will begin a new partnership in January...

Geeks Bearing Gifts, Part II: Forms – The Article is Dead. Long Live the Article.

Now I start sharing chapters from the second part of Geeks Bearing Gifts: Imagining New Futures for News. In the first, I reimagined the relationship journalism has with the public it serves. In the second part, I examine new forms journalism can take. (In the third, I’ll get to the sexy part: business.) The entire […]

Morning Report for December 18, 2014

“I’m a realist” about the state of journalism, says Jack Shafer. “I’m neither an optimist nor a pessimist.” (digiday.com) A year of turmoil and change at the New York Times. (capitalnewyork.com) Cuban journalists visit Cal State Fullerton’s student newspaper. (ocregister.com) Yes, readers will pay for worthwhile online content. (niemanlab.org) Waco … Read More

An old media scoop on pro-ISIS tweeter Shami Witness leads to a new media dox

While the UK’s Channel 4 didn’t release the full name of Shami Witness, one of the most prolific tweeters of ISIS propaganda, when they reported on his identity last Thursday, they might as well have. “He says exposure will endanger his life and we have no way of knowing how true that may be,” said correspondent Simon Israel in the...

Ken Doctor: “Rosewater,” cascading censorship, and press freedom

I remember the early summer day in Moscow well. I had one day to myself to explore a bit of the city after conducting a two-day workshop for Russian regional publishers. By late afternoon, I was ready to return to the hotel and prepare for the next morning’s flight home. I braved the Moscow Metro,...

Bad community is worse than no community

2015 should be the year your digital publication rethinks its community strategy. First question: Do you really care enough to do it right? As Kyle Chayka wrote this week, people are increasingly retreating to safe spaces. All the best conversation is happening in GroupMe, Slack, WhatsApp, private email lists, or over drinks after work. People...

Immersion in (virtual) reality

As someone who puts “dissecting future-of-news discourses” high in her research interests, coming up with my own prediction for 2015 is an awkward exercise. I leave the real attempt at futurology to the crew of talented media gurus that write in these columns, but there’s still something that I would like to see more in...

A return to subscriptions

2015 will see a tipping point in favor of subscription-based journalism online. The Gamergate debacle demonstrated conclusively that the public’s access to information is vulnerable to those least equipped to guard that door — publicists and brand managers. Whoever imagines that Gawker — which recently lost substantial ad revenues in the wake of a literally...

News organizations get serious about research

I have a confession to make: What you are about to read is as much a plea as it is a prediction. But in the spirit of the holiday season, I trust you will not shy away from reading an analysis written from a place of hope. Historically, news organizations have invested a very small...

More gonzo, less paywall

Newspapers are not done experimenting with paywalls. This is unfortunate, because valuable energy is wasted on figuring out how to charge for content rather than producing content readers will want to pay for. Newer generations of readers are not accustomed to paying for the news — a trend introduced not by social media or the...

Copyright © 2011 Regator, LLC