All Blogs / Lifestyle / Food & Drink / Posts With Audio


If War Is Hell, Then Coffee Has Offered U.S. Soldiers Some Salvation

"Nobody can soldier without coffee," a Union cavalryman wrote in 1865. Hidden Kitchens looks at three American wars through the lens of coffee: the Civil War, Vietnam and Afghanistan.

Warm Smiles and Cold Beers at Cruz Blanca

With so many breweries opening up nowadays (620 did in 2015 according to the Brewers Association), it is sometimes hard to get excited for a specific one to debut.  But there was much excitement this summer when Cruz Blanca, the newShow More Summary

Give Chickpeas A Chance: Why Hummus Unites, And Divides, The Mideast

Nothing is simple in Mideast relations. Not even hummus. Lebanon, Israel and Palestinians are entangled over who owns the dish. Not even the title of world's largest hummus platter settled the matter.

Congress Just Passed A GMO Labeling Bill. Nobody’s Super Happy About It

The proposal will require food companies to disclose their GMO ingredients, but that information doesn't have to be on the packaging. It's a compromise, and neither side is all that enthused.

As Bagged Salad Kits Boom, Americans Eat More Greens

Americans buy twice as many packages of bagged salad greens as heads of lettuce these days. Is the bagged stuff just as good? If it gets you to eat more leafy greens, yes.

The Chef for Every Age

Before Anthony Bourdain, Mario Batali, or even Alice Waters, there was X. Marcel Boulestin T here is one thing above all you must avoid when making an omelette," advised the chef in a thick Anglo-French accent, "and that is an inferiority...Show More Summary

Fermentation Fervor: Here’s How Chefs Boost Flavor And Health

As more chefs experiment with microorganisms to transform ingredients and create new flavors, fermentation has gone from ancient preservation technique to culinary tool du jour.

This Is How Much Celebrities Get Paid To Endorse Soda And Unhealthy Food

Beyonce got $50 million to push Pepsi. Justin Timberlake: $6 million in a deal with McDonald's. A study describes the lucrative deals celebs popular with teens and young adults inked to sell food.

The Search For Tastier Supermarket Tomatoes: A Tale In 3 Acts

Supermarket tomatoes have a terrible reputation. But the industry is evolving. More than half of supermarket tomatoes now are grown in greenhouses or "shade houses," and flavor is improving.

GMOs Are Safe, But Don’t Always Deliver On Promises, Top Scientists Say

A new report from the National Academy of Sciences knocked down some pro-GMO claims, such as that they've boosted crop yields, and urged federal agencies to change the way these foods are regulated.

A Beer At…The Publican

The Bar Towel is proud to present a new series entitled “A Beer At…”, where we feature a single bar or restaurant, have a beer there and get a feel for what makes them special. Our first visit is to Chicago’s famed The Publican, a shrine to beer and pork in the city’s hot Fulton […] The post A Beer At…The Publican appeared first on The Bar Towel.

Why Restaurants Are Ditching The Switch To No Tipping

It's customer and staff complaints that did away with the model to start, but that's also what's bringing the tradition back to restaurants that've been experimenting with the policy to even out pay.

The Environmental Cost Of Growing Food

Economists are working on ways to put a price on the environmental damage of growing food. Take sugar: Half of what we eat comes from beets, half from cane. Each has an impact, in very different ways.

Why Chobani Gave Employees A Financial Stake In Company’s Future

Workers at the yogurt-maker got a potential windfall when the company said it would give them shares that could be worth up to 10 percent of the firm. It reflects a rising trend in employee ownership.

Coffee Workers’ Concerns Brew Over Chemical’s Link To Lung Disease

A chemical called diacetyl, which is released as a natural byproduct of the coffee roasting process, has been linked to lung disease. A CDC group advises coffee plants to take precautions.

Will Genetically ‘Edited’ Food Be Regulated? The Case Of The Mushroom

The U.S. is trying to figure out whether, and how, to regulate crops that have had their genes "edited." One example: a mushroom that doesn't brown when cut. It could be the first of many such crops.

‘Farm To Fable’? Tampa Probe Finds Many Restaurants Lie About Sourcing

Food critic Laura Reiley of the Tampa Bay Times spent two months investigating where her local eateries were really getting their ingredients. Many of their "farm-to-table" claims proved bogus.

Is There Wood Pulp In That Parmesan? How Scientists Sniff Out Food Fraud

Whether it's olive oil that's not so extra-virgin or burgers with a hint of horse meat, Chris Elliott, founder of the Institute for Global Food Security, explains how his laboratory uncovers fraud.

The Sporkful’s New Podcast Tackles Race, Food, and Cultural Identity

The next episode of Other People's Food features actress Rosie Perez From the studios of WNYC, Dan Pashman and Anne Noyes Saini produce The Sporkful, which, put simply, is a podcast about food. In a recently launched series called "Other...Show More Summary

Why Whole Foods Wants A Slower-Growing Chicken

A modern broiler, or meat chicken, grows incredibly fast. The bird suffers as a result, and some critics say its flavor does too. Now Whole Foods wants its suppliers to shift to slower-growing breeds.

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC