Post Profile






Dice, divination and a third

In Paleoglot: The dicey proof of Etruscan numerals, while a general tendency existed for two opposing sides on classical rolling dice to add up to seven, I explain that it wasn't a hard-fast rule in the past. Other possibilities existed.[1] Nonetheless, quite a few Etruscanists and avid hobbyists will still leap to the over-assertive conclusion that the Etruscan dice must follow this pattern.
read more

share

Related Posts


Blogosphere ~ The recent Sarteano inscription on an Etruscan plate

History / Ancient History : Rogue Classicism

Paleoglot: The recent Sarteano inscription on an Etruscan plate.

More sides or more dice?

Academics : The Endeavour

My previous post looked at rolling 5 six-sided dice as an approximation of a normal distribution. If you wanted a better approximation, you could roll dice with more sides, or you could roll more dice. Which helps more? Whether you ...

Paleoglot | The history of the translation of Etruscan cvil

History / Ancient History : Rogue Classicism

Paleoglot The history of the translation of Etruscan cvil http://ift.tt/KYcvsf

The Big 12 might have found the dumbest rule possible

Sports / Baseball : Baseball Nation

Home teams "can be subject to penalty if they show controversial replays too much." All rules exist between two sets of opposing concepts. The first is clarity versus flexibility. You want rules to be clear, so players and coaches k...

Etruscan future tense?

Academics / Linguistics : Paleoglot

Carrying from my previous post, I've been thinking about tense and the workings of Etruscan grammar. Generally in world languages, I notice a tendency for temporal concepts like past, present and future that we find in verbs to be e...

Comments



Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC