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Sense Of Touch In The Blind Improved By Practice, Not Loss Of Sight

New research from McMaster University may answer a controversial question: do the blind have a better sense of touch because the brain compensates for vision loss or because of heavy reliance on their fingertips? The study, published in the most recent edition of the Journal of Neuroscience, suggests daily dependence on touch is the answer. Twenty-eight profoundly blind participants - with varying degrees of Braille expertise - and 55 normally sighted adults were tested for touch sensitivity on six fingers and both sides of the lower lip.
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