Post Profile






Monkeys move virtual arm with their minds

3 years agoHealth : The Chart

Remember the hit movie Avatar, where the human brain alone could control a lifelike hybrid body, seeing what it sees and feeling what it feels? Scientists at Duke University are one step closer to making that concept a reality, with important applications for medicine. They have developed a system through which a monkey can control [...]
read more

share

Related Posts


Monkeys use minds to move 2 virtual arms

Academics / General Science : Science Codex (last year)

DURHAM, N.C. – In a study led by Duke researchers, monkeys have learned to control the movement of both arms on an avatar using just their brain activity. The findings, published Nov. 6, 2013, in the journal Science Translational Me...

Monkeys grab and feel virtual objects with thoughts alone (and what this means for the World Cup)

Academics / General Science : Not Exactly Rocket Science (3 years ago)

This is where we are now: at Duke University, a monkey controls a virtual arm using only its thoughts. Miguel Nicolelis had fitted the animal with a headset of electrodes that translates its brain activity into movements. It can gra...

Monkeys 'move and feel' virtual objects using only their brains

Academics / General Science : Science Daily (3 years ago)

In a first ever demonstration of a two-way interaction between a primate brain and a virtual body, two trained monkeys learned to employ brain activity alone to move an avatar hand and identify the texture of virtual objects.

Monkeys 'move and feel' virtual objects using only their brains

Academics / General Science : Science Codex (3 years ago)

DURHAM, N.C.-- In a first ever demonstration of a two-way interaction between a primate brain and a virtual body, two monkeys trained at the Duke University Center for Neuroengineering learned to employ brain activity alone to move ...

Using Only Their Brains, Monkeys 'Move And Feel' Virtual Objects

Health : Medical News Today (3 years ago)

In a first ever demonstration of a two-way interaction between a primate brain and a virtual body, two monkeys trained at the Duke University Center for Neuroengineering learned to employ brain activity alone to move an avatar hand ...

Comments



Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC