Post Profile






UC Davis study shows that the increase in obesity among California school children has slowed

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- After years of increases in the rates of childhood obesity, a new UC Davis study shows that the increase slowed from 2003 to 2008 among California school children. While encouraged by the results, the authors expressed concern about a group of youngsters currently driving the increase in obesity: children under age 10. read more
read more

share

Related Posts


Increased adiposity and reduced physical activity in children: Cause or effect?

Academics / General Science : Science Daily

Increased adiposity is likely to cause reduced physical activity in children, according to new research. The results of the study suggest that promoting weight loss in overweight and obese children might also increase childhood acti...

The Lancet: Most comprehensive global study to date shows obesity rates climbing worldwide

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

Worldwide, there has been a startling increase in rates of obesity and overweight in both adults (28% increase) and children (up by 47%) in the past 33 years, with the number of overweight and obese people rising from 857 million in...

Childhood obesity found linked to math performance

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

Obesity among children has increased dramatically over the past 40 years and has been tied to many health problems. Now a new study has found that children's weight is associated with their math performance. The longitudinal study, ...

Obesity, mood disorders increase peripartum cardiomyopathy risk

Academics / General Science : Science Daily

Anxiety, depression and bipolar disorder doubles the risk of peripartum cardiomyopathy during childbirth, while obesity leads to a 1.7-fold increase, researchers report. Women with common pregnancy-related symptoms such as shortness...

Health-care worker visits increase hepatitis B screening rates for Hmong Americans

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) — In the first study of its kind, lay health workers increased screening rates for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and knowledge about the disease among a group of Asian Americans, known as the Hmong, UC Davis researche...

Comments



Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC