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The boys are bad: Older male ants single out younger rivals for death squad

Male Cardiocondyla obscurior ants are diphenic (either winged or wingless). New research demonstrates that the dominant wingless (ergatoid) male is able to identify potential rivals before they emerge from their pupae. Constant patrolling of the nest ensures that this male is able to bite or chemically tag rivals as soon as they emerge from their pupae. Chemically tagged ants are quickly destroyed by workers.
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