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Protein abundant in cancerous cells causes DNA 'supercoiling'

A team of USC scientists has identified a protein that can change DNA topology, making DNA twist up into a so-called "supercoil." The finding provides new insight about the role of the protein—known as mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM)—in cancer cells, which have high levels of MCM. read more
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