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Getting CLARITY: Hydrogel process developed at Stanford creates transparent brain

STANFORD, Calif. — Combining neuroscience and chemical engineering, researchers at Stanford University have developed a process that renders a mouse brain transparent. The postmortem brain remains whole — not sliced or sectioned in any way — with its three-dimensional complexity of fine wiring and molecular structures completely intact and able to be measured and probed at will with visible light and chemicals.
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Combining neuroscience and chemical engineering, researchers have developed a process that renders a mouse brain transparent.

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