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Antidepressants double the risk of aggression and suicide in children

Children and adolescents have a doubled risk of aggression and suicide when taking one of the five most commonly prescribed antidepressants, according to findings of a study published in The BMJ today. However, the true risk for all associated serious harms--such as deaths, aggression, akathisia and suicidal thoughts and attempts--remains unknown for children, adolescents and adults, say experts.
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