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Tiny Fossils Suggest Antarctica's Largest Ice Sheet Could Collapse

At the bottom of the world atop the forbidding Transantarctic Mountains sit the fossilized remains of microscopic, ocean-dwelling diatoms. For thirty years, scientists have argued over how these tiny algae came to rest thousands of feet above the sea. Now, sophisticated ice sheet models offer one of the best explanations yet—and it doesn’t bode well for our future. Read more...
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Scanning electron micrograph of diatom-rich sediments from the Southern Ocean. Image: Scherer et al. 2016. At the bottom of the world atop the forbidding Transantarctic Mountains sit the fossilized remains of microscopic, ocean-dwel...

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