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Climate Change Is Making (Crustacean) Men Sexier

A common marine crustacean has shown researchers that it’s all set to beat climate change — the males will get more attractive to the females, with a resulting population explosion. The University of Adelaide study is the first to show how mating behavior could change under the warmer waters and more acidic oceans brought by climate change. More »      
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