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New research explores how wetlands and agriculture, not fossil fuels could be causing a global rise in methane

Research published today in the American Geophysical Union's journal Global Biogeochemical Cycles shows that recent rises in levels of methane in our atmosphere is being driven by biological sources, such as swamp gas, cow burps, or rice fields, rather than fossil fuel emissions.
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