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Global Warming Could Wipe Out Breakfast Cereals By 2070

Global warming could rapidly reduce the cultivation of wheat and rice, threatening the production of breakfast cereals along with half of all the calories consumed by humans. A study looking ahead to 2070 found that climate change was occurring 5,000 times faster than certain grasses can adapt, the New Scientist reports. Wheat, rice, maize, rye, barley and sorghum are all edible grasses that yield nutritious grains.
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