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Team suggests nanoscale electronic motion sensor as DNA sequencer

Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and collaborators have proposed a design for the first DNA sequencer based on an electronic nanosensor that can detect tiny motions as small as a single atom...
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