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A little brain science could help to keep your fears at bay

A team of researchers from MIT has discovered a circuit in the brains of mice that, when stimulated, can prolong the effects of therapy designed to suppress fear-related phobias. The results of the study could lead to more effective therapy aimed at people suffering from debilitating phobias such as a fear of flying, and could even aid in the treatment of more complex disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
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