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Wild grass species found unable to adapt rapidly enough to survive global warming

(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with the University of Arizona has found evidence that suggests many wild grass species will be at risk of disappearing from certain areas as the planet heats up. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Alice Cang, Ashley Wilson and John Wiens describe the study they carried out on the speed with which wild grass species can adapt to change, what they found and what it might mean for the future of many important crops.
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