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How to Craft a Winning Product Roadmap Presentation

So, you just built an awesome roadmap. Congrats. Customers are going to love it because you prioritized what many of them were asking for. You did a fine job working with the sales team to make sure they were aligned with the product's direction. And engineering was standing tall right by your side in full agreement. You were also able to keep the executive team's pet priorities at arm's length.
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