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The American Jewish Accent.

Dan Nosowitz has a wonderful Atlas Obscura post called “Why Linguists are Fascinated by the American Jewish Accent”; here’s a bit of it: But is really a religious or ethnic thing? Can we call it a “Jewish accent” rather than, say, a “New York accent”? Scholars say, yes, there is an American Jewish accent, but […]
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