Post Profile






Giant Thai Insect Reveals Clues to Human Heart Disease

Taylor and his team used an electron microscope to capture the first three-dimensional image of a tiny filament, or strand, of an essential muscle that the palm-sized water bug Lethocerus indicus uses to fly.. This image shows for the first time the individual molecules in the filament in a relaxed state, which is necessary to re-extend muscles.
read more

share

Related Posts


Images reveal structure of heart cells that may hold heart attack clues

Academics / General Science : ScienceDaily: Science Society

Newly released images revealing the 'bicycle spoke' structure of a heart cell may hold key clues to reducing damage from a heart attack. Using a novel type of electron microscopy, researchers produced 3D images of a healthy heart ce...

Hide, ambush, kill, eat: The giant water bug Lethocerus patruelis kills a fish

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

During their study of the giant water bug N. Simov and M. Langourov from the study team had the unique chance to witness and record on video the vicious predatory practices of the species. In the recorded material, a larva uses the ...

Giant Water Bug Lethocerus Patruelis Kills A Fish (Photo)

Issues & Causes / Environmentalism : Planetsave

The giant water bug — Lethocerus patruelis — is a very large bug, in fact it’s the largest “true bug” in Europe and also the largest water insect. The adults grow as large as 8cm in length — and the biggest representatives of the sa...

Hide, ambush, kill, eat: The giant water bug Lethocerus patruelis kills a fish

Academics / General Science : ScienceDaily: Science Society

The largest European water insect Lethocerus patruelis, commonly known as giant water bug, can reach the impressive size of up to 8 cm in length. A recent study provides detailed information on karyotype and the reproductive system ...

Giant thai insect reveals clues to human heart disease

Academics / Biology : Physorg: Biology

What can a Thai water bug teach us about our muscles, especially the heart? A lot, says Professor of Biological Science Kenneth Taylor. New research by Taylor published today in Science Advances gives scientists better insight into ...

Comments


Copyright © 2016 Regator, LLC