Post Profile






Lock Up Your Raspberry Pi with Google Authenticator

Raspberry Pi boards (or any of the many similar boards) are handy to leave at odd places to talk to the network and collect data, control things, or do whatever other tasks you need a tiny fanless computer to do. Of course, any time you have a computer on a network, you are inviting hackers (and not our kind of hackers) to break in. We recently looked at how to tunnel ssh using a reverse proxy via Pagekite so you can connect to a Pi even through firewalls and at dynamic IP addresses.
read more

share

Related Posts


Raspberry Pi Zero Motor Controller: ZeroBorg

Technology / Gadgets : technabob

PiBorg specializes in motor controllers and sensors for the Raspberry Pi, as well as robot kits based on the affordable computer. The company’s latest controller is for the tiny Raspberry Pi Zero, one that’s equally compact…

Raspberry Pi as a plug-in hash harvester

Technology / Gadgets : Hack a Day

Plug in the power and Ethernet and this Raspberry Pi board will automatically collect Windows hashes from computers on the network. With a couple of RPi boards on hand [Travis] was searching for more hacks to try with them. This mad...

Tiny quad-core ARM Linux/Android computer delivers serious power for $129

Technology : Venture Beat

The tiny $35 Raspberry Pi set off a surge of demand for tiny Linux computers earlier this year. But a Korean hardware manufacturer called Hardkernel is launching a high-end computer board that measures just 3.5 inches by 3.7 inches....

Google+ brings Collections to its iOS app in latest update

Technology : Venture Beat

Social network Google+ is bringing its recently launched feature called Collections to iOS starting today. Launched in May, Collections functions similarly to Pinterest pin boards. Google+ users can create “a collection” around a ce...

Very, Very Tiny X86 Systems

Technology / Gadgets : Hack a Day

The most interesting market for Intel in recent years has been very, very small form factor PCs. ARM is eating them alive, of course, but there are still places where very small and very low power x86 boards make sense. The latest r...

Comments


Copyright © 2016 Regator, LLC