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Take care with traditional fare during the High Holidays

Editor’s note: Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown today and continues for two days. It marks the beginning of the New Year on the Jewish calendar. Among its many highlights, autumn ushers in the Jewish High Holidays. While this is a time of celebration and prayer, it also means cooking meals for family and friends. To... Continue Reading
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