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Living together in mud: New bivalve species dwelling on a sea cucumber discovered in Japan

(Pensoft Publishers) Most bivalves live in sand or mud or attached to rock surface. However, a new bivalve species described from Japan lives on a sea cucumber that burrows in mudflats. This species is attached to the host by thin threads and uses host burrows as shelter from predators. This species, published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, is one of the smallest species in the genus, which is probably an adaptation to a narrow host burrow.
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