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Keeping your synapses sharp: How spermidine reverses age-related memory decline

(PLOS) The ability to form new memories ('learning') diminishes drastically for many with age. In the article published Sept. 29 in open-access journal PLOS Biology, work by the groups of Stephan Sigrist from the Freie Universität Berlin, Andrea Fiala (Universität Göttingen) and Frank Madeo (Universität Graz) shows that specific synapse changes directly provoke age-related dementia, but administering spermidine, a substance already found in our bodies, is protective against age-induced memory impairment.
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