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Two new studies uncover key players responsible for learning and memory formation

(Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience) One of the most fascinating properties of the mammalian brain is its capacity to change throughout life. Experiences, whether studying for a test or experiencing a traumatic situation, alter our brains by modifying the activity and organization of specific neural circuitry, thereby modifying subsequent feelings, thoughts, and behavior.
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