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The Surprise Risk Factor In Sleep Apnea? Your Ethnicity

Obstructive sleep apnea can have a notable impact on brain health. In reducing the quantity of oxygen the brain receives during sleep, sleep apnea can cut down on the amount of nourishing “deep sleep” a person gets each night, something that can impair memory and increase the chances of depression. People who are overweight have a greater chance of developing sleep apnea, but there’s another, perhaps surprising risk factor at work as well ? your ethnicity.
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