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Cold and bubbly: The sensory qualities that best quench thirst

(Monell Chemical Senses Center) New research from the Monell Center finds that oral perceptions of coldness and carbonation help to reduce thirst. The findings could guide sensory approaches to increase fluid intake in populations at risk for dehydration, including the elderly, soldiers, and athletes.
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