Post Profile






A tour de (tiny) force

(Duke University) From the blood coursing through our veins to the fly landing on our arm, we sense forces both inside and outside of our bodies. A Duke University study takes researchers a step further to understanding a crucial force-sensing receptor whose dysfunction is tied to rare blood disorders. The technology applied in this study represents a new tool for researchers who want to apply the tiniest touches to receptors in living cells.
read more

share

Related Posts


Study the inside of a Pokeball at Singapore's first Pokemon Research Exhibition - CNET

Technology : CNET: News

The Pokemon Research Exhibition travels outside Japan for the first time ever.

Surgeons at Duke University Hospital Implant Bioengineered Vein

Health : Newswise Medical News

In a first-of-its-kind operation in the United States, a team of doctors at Duke University Hospital helped create a bioengineered blood vessel and implanted it into the arm of a patient with end-stage kidney disease. The procedure,...

Banked blood grows stiffer with age, study finds

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the body, says a new study from University of Illinois research...

How mechanical force triggers blood clotting at the molecular scale

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

Using a unique single-molecule force measurement tool, a research team has developed a clearer understanding of how platelets sense the mechanical forces they encounter during bleeding to initiate the cascading process that leads to...

A quartet of genes controls growth of blood stem cells

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

An important element in getting blood stem cells to multiply outside the body is to understand which of the approximately 20 000 genes in the human body control their growth. A research team at Lund University in Sweden has studied ...

Comments


Copyright © 2016 Regator, LLC