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Deepwater Horizon oil spill caused widespread marsh erosion

(Duke University) Marsh erosion caused by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill was widespread, a new study of 103 Gulf Coast sites reveals. At sites where oil coated more than 90 percent of plants' stems, erosion rates were up to 1.6 meters per year higher than at other sites, and erosion continued for up to two years. The study identifies 90 percent as the threshold above which accelerated erosion occurred.
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