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Slow slip events can trigger earthquakes

In subduction zones, where one tectonic plate slides beneath another, slow, imperceptible slip, known as 'slow earthquakes' or 'slow slip events', can trigger powerful quakes a little further away. This has just been shown by researchers from CNRS, Université Grenoble Alpes and IRD, in collaboration with colleagues at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. Their paper is published in the journal Nature Geoscience on 3 october 2016.
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