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Great hammerhead sharks swim on their sides to reduce energy expenditure

(Research Organization of Information and Systems) This study revealed that great hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna mokarran) swim on their sides at roll angles of approximately 60°. This helps them to avoid sinking and minimizes their energy expenditure while swimming.
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